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Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (BFA) in Industrial Design

FYE: FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE
Required Major Courses: Fallcredits
FYE100: Systems of Drawing
Drawing is a primary strategy for creative activities in art, language, communications, engineering and design. In this course, students are introduced to various forms of knowing through seeing and drawing. Different drawing systems are investigated both in the field and classroom, and are aligned with areas of study of creative practice today. Each drawing system will be explored as both a foundational skill set and a tactical approach to success in later creative endeavors.
3.0
FYE110: Visual Language
This course is an introduction to composition and color theory. Students will learn and apply the elements and principles of art and design in a variety of assignments through a variety of traditional and digital tools and media. All assignments will focus on how ideation techniques are fundamental to creative problem solving. Students will gain a clear understanding of how 2D elements and compositional theory are employed to create clear and effective visual communication, aid personal expression, and help comprise a personal aesthetic. Students will learn to identify how 2D fundamentals are employed in contemporary, professional, and historical work.
3.0
FYE130: Fabrication
The focus of this course will be form, light, and content. Students will learn to imbue three-dimensional form with meaning and also investigate how light can affect perceptions of form and space. Research strategies, fabrication, and digital and material techniques are advanced through hands-on experiments, projects, and in-depth discussion. Students receive an orientation to MIAD’s 3-D Lab and Open Lab.
3.0
FYE150: Digital 2D
In Digital 2D, students are introduced to image/content creation, manipulation, editing, and management through Adobe Suite programs. Students will learn proper file management and workflow techniques, along with proper digital documentation and presentation of work. Students will also employ digital terminology across a wide range of disciplines and practices while also recognizing the cultural implications of digital creation, appropriation, and distribution. By the end of the course, students will have built a solid foundation of digital knowledge and skills that will benefit them as visual creators and communicators.
3.0
Required Major Courses: Spring
FYE199: IAS:
Introduction to Advanced Study offers a unique and broad-based exposure in advanced-level art and design disciplines offered at MIAD. The philosophy behind Introduction to Advanced Study is to invite students to explore problem solving and ways of working within the majors. Students will be actively engaged in making as a mode of inquiry and will gain experience in both the conceptual basis for the disciplines as well as the practical processes of the disciplines studied. Faculty will offer a variety of course structures and themes.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FYE100, FYE110 & FYE130
3.0
FYE121: RPC:
Research, Process and Connection is a theme-based introductory course in which students conduct research and engage in a creative process that leads to a body of visual work. Each section of RPC is devoted to a particular idea, process, or approach. Students will develop concepts, translate ideas, and apply methods as they make their work. Students will explore their work and thinking within a historical, cultural, and personal context. This will be reinforced through critical dialogue during stages of ideation, production, completion, and evaluation.
At the end of the semester, students are required to present their final research in a digital presentation. These presentations should demonstrate visual evidence of work completed throughout the semester as well as the ability to analyze their progress and learning in a public format.
3.0
FYE151: Digital 4D
Digital 4D considers how image, text and sound unfold over time and across various distribution models. Students will learn and reinforce proper file management and workflow techniques, along with proper digital documentation and presentation of work. Students are introduced to video editing, basic animation, and audio tools, they will gain experience in using a variety of software and hardware, while considering their role as cultural producers. Motion graphics and the onscreen image-as-experience will be introduced. By the end of this course, through a series of projects, students will have completed a self-determined final project that incorporates a design or fine arts focus, and demonstrates an understanding of basic 4D principles.
3.0
Liberal Studies: FYE
WRTG120: Processes of Inquiry
The first-year writing seminar will emphasize the significance of inquiry. Students will experience writing as an intellectual, creative and meaning-making act. Practicing writing as inquiry will enable students to learn the skills, strategies, and conceptual frameworks that will transfer to every new learning context and situation. The course serves as a writing-based first year seminar in which students integrate their learning across all of their courses.
3.0
ARTH151: Intro to the Practice of Art & Design History
In this course, students will explore key works and moments of art and design across culture and time, while learning proper terminology and methodology for analyzing visual images, objects, and structures within the study of the discipline. Students will contextualize and interpret works recognizing that different interpretive frameworks can be used to analyze works of art and design. As a broad approach to the discipline, the course encourages inquiry, critical evaluation, and curiosity about the richness of art and design history. Students will acquire the analytical skills to navigate, translate, diagram, and express the complexities of visual culture and production.
3.0
HUMT121: Intro to Humanities
Humanities is the study of what it means to be human through cultural inquiry and analysis. In this introductory course, students explore texts, artifacts, and situations to broaden their perspective and understanding of the human condition. Frames of inquiry will be influenced by history, culture, economics, political power and other social circumstances. The course takes an intersectional approach to analysis, examining the interconnected nature of societal categories such as race, class, and gender. In this class, research and dialogue are the fundamental modes of learning
3.0
Students complete 15 credits each semester first year to complete degree requirements in four years
SOPHOMORE
Required Major Courses: Fallcredits
DS240: Materials & Methods I
Materials & Methods I builds upon the development of design process with attention to the refinement of design skills through efficient research, analysis, problem-solving and project development. Emphasis is placed on the student’s ability to recognize and comprehend the responsibility of the designer to society at large.

This course focuses on the skills required to fulfill specific conceptual objectives using a variety of materials and processes. Students will use the design processes of concept drawing, pattern making, and mock-ups to design original work which becomes the basis for the establishment of skills criteria. Assimilation of information from lectures, demonstrations, hand-outs and studio experiences will be evident as students execute a series of increasingly sophisticated shapes, forms in woods, metals, plastics and composition materials. Emphasis is placed on the safe and intelligent use of tools particularly stationary power equipment. e.g., machines that cut, drill, spot-weld, grind and finish. Techniques of fabrication of designed objects will be explored such as cut plans and layouts, proper location of drilling holes, riveting and finishing for example. Mass production methods will be explored and developed for the last project and developed for sale at MIAD in the Design Factory.

This course will address material focused projects emphasizing design processes typical of industrial design as practiced professionally. Students will identify and demonstrate a clear understanding of the designed object by creating multiple form languages. These projects will place emphasis on industrial design students’ ability to be innovative and creative.

This analysis will include a study of materials, form, function, use, scale, and user interface and user experience. The project will then culminate in a design that incorporates the traditional design process of sketches, form refinement, digital drafting, sketch models, final appearance model, and photo-documented booklet, suitable for client presentation and/or inclusion in a portfolio.

Materials & Methods I emphasizes the specific hand and power tool techniques necessary to develop controlled edges, surfaces and assemblies through a series of increasingly difficult design problems and using a variety of materials including plastics, woods, metals, adhesives, paints and fasteners. Accompanying assignments are the processes of sketching alternative ideas and refinement of forms through mock-ups, maquettes, patterns and orthographic drawings.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F130 & F113/F115
3.0
DS250: Industrial Design I
The focus in Industrial Design I is the principles and elements of three-dimensional design as they relate to form, structure, and industrial design. Topics include the theory of organization of forms, product semantics, aesthetics, introduction to engineering principles, and the basic skills of the design process.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F130 & F113/F115
3.0
DS252: Technical Illustration
Technical Illustration continues the development of technical drawing skills presented in the first year. The fundamentals of depicting two- and three-dimensional space, form and structure are addressed. Emphasis is given to both technical understanding and visual portrayals of objects and volumes, and orthographic view projection.

Using a step-by-step series of assignments, students will develop competency in orthographic, isometric and perspective views of designs leading to basic design control drawing documentation. Included in the course will be graphic page layout, hand-lettering, visual hierarchy, form depiction with shading, shadow casting, and reflections. Students will learn how to layout accurate perspective with correct focal length and dimensional indexing using Trimble SketchUp. Basic CAD will be introduced using SolidWorks.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F130 & F113/F115
3.0
Required Major Courses: Spring
DS241: Materials & Methods II
Building upon the information and skills developed in Materials & Methods I, the emphasis in Materials & Methods II is placed on mechanism, the relationship between internal components, structure and form, additive and reductive means of developing form and the means by which multiple parts are produced. Students develop the knowledge to produce accurately finished models with hand techniques in a variety of materials.

Materials & Methods II is divided into two projects each subdivided into two phases. The first phase of the first project is an in-depth analysis of the gears, pulleys, shafts, bearings, and cams etc., which make up a mechanism. This first phase of the project is followed by a mechanical problem involving the transfer of power to a wheel set held within a light-weight structure. The setting will include performance objectives using a limited power source.

The second project requires form, function and semantic resolution using automotive modeling clay. Multiple parts, product graphics and color will be generated in the process of building a final appearance model.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS240
3.0
DS251: Industrial Design II
The focus in Industrial Design II the principles and elements of three-dimensional design as they relate to function, value and aesthetics. Building on the skills and knowledge gained in ID1, a series of projects will develop the students’ ability to successfully solve specific fundamental problems in form and function and present the work in a cohesive and professional format. Topics will include research, analysis, semantics, user interface, form construction and visual communication.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS250
3.0
DS253: Visualization Techniques I
Drawing skills presented in Technical Illustration are developed further in Visualization Techniques I. Students will briefly review perspective theories and master multiple techniques for creating and communicating a wide variety of product forms through drawing. Attention is given to the accurate depiction of product forms, surfaces and details in a variety of media during this course.

This is the second course in a series of four courses designed to develop the student’s ability to draw concepts and ideas in a professional studio environment. Students are instructed in specific techniques used to describe a wide variety of forms, surfaces and designs.

This course addresses essential techniques and skills which are applied to visual problem solving. Demonstrations will be made with a variety of traditional drawing and rendering media in class. Essential tools include Prismacolor Pencils, Pens, Markers and a few key paper selections.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS252
3.0
Studio Electives
3cr Studio Elective
A studio elective is any studio course (art or design major course) within MIAD's entire Program of Study, as long as it not a requirement of the student's major, and as long as the student meets the prerequisite(s). In addition to required courses from all eleven majors, each semester MIAD offers various special electives with a range of topics.
3.0
Liberal Studies: Sophomore
WR200: Critical and Creative Forms
Critical and Creative Forms is an intermediate-level writing course that focuses on writing as a creative and critical form. Students will explore the formal qualities of a variety of “texts,” including visual and online texts, and expand their experience of writing analytically and creatively. It is an intensification of the processes introduced in WR120 with further emphasis on visual as well as verbal rhetorics and critical thinking.

In WR200, students will develop their ability to read and assess communication in various forms and genres, to write analytical and critical essays, to perform increasingly sophisticated research, and to experiment with communicative form themselves. WR200 focuses on the theme of “environments,” examining the idea or condition of “environment” through a variety of possible progressive lenses, including ecological, natural, cultural, sacred or built environments.

WR200 emphasizes writing-in-process and students are challenged to take progressively more individual responsibility for all phases of the process, from journaling to the composing of final manuscripts. Students will be expected to identify, research and articulate points of view with increasing sophistication and ease in order to engage in critical conversations. Students participate in writing workshops, writing groups, small group discussions and collaborative writing as well as complete individual writing assignments. Throughout, students will be required to demonstrate evolving critical judgment and self- reflection. Self-directed research and working proficiently with primary and secondary sources is also emphasized through assignments highlighting the research process and the creation of an annotated bibliography.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): WR120 or WR111
3.0
SC220: Patterns in Nature
The Introduction to Natural Sciences is based upon first hand investigations and discoveries in the field of Natural Sciences. In this course students will deepen their understanding of the nature of the scientific method, its theoretical challenges, and pursue a series of empirical applications in the lab and in the field. This practical knowledge will be broadened through intensive reading, discussions, critiques, and oral assignments. This is an intensive, practical approach that uses the scientific method as a tool for investigation, problem solving and critical thinking. This course is challenging and demanding, but rewarding. Excellence in analytical and critical thinking skills are of utmost importance.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): none
3.0
AH213: History of Modernism-Design
The History of Modernism: Design outlines major styles and trends in communication design, illustration, industrial design, architecture and interior architecture & design, from the beginning of the industrial period to the present. Through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments, students have the opportunity to study the philosophical, social, cultural and commercial concerns of such primary movements as Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, Bauhaus, Art Deco and Post Modernism within Europe, the United States and Japan.

AH213 will provide students with an historical perspective of the designer’s world since the beginning of the 19th century. Students will gain an understanding of the major figures, movements and styles in design that have emerged since the beginning of the modern industrial period, and of the social and cultural forces that are the basis of the evolving craft of the designer. While significant emphasis will be placed on design of the recent past, students will be required to demonstrate understanding of the relationship between recent trends in design and the traditions from which they emerged. AH213 emphasizes the critical process and stresses writing as a primary means of demonstrating knowledge in these areas. Strong emphasis will be placed on all manifestations of modern and contemporary design as it concerns both two and three-dimensional forms.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): WR120 and AH151 or equivalencies
3.0
Students complete 15 credits each semester second year to complete degree requirements in four years
JUNIOR
Required Major Courses: Fallcredits
DS340: Industrial Design III
Industrial Design III builds upon the development of design process with attention to the refinement of design skills through efficient research, analysis, problem-solving and project development. Emphasis is placed on the student’s ability to recognize and comprehend the responsibility of the designer to society at large.

This course will address client-focused projects emphasizing design processes typical of industrial design as practiced professionally. The first project involves the breakdown, analysis and redesign of a product or a tool that contains mechanical components. The second project involves the analysis and redesign of an electronic consumer product. Students will identify and demonstrate a clear understanding of visual brand language by creating multiple form languages. One of these two projects may be a collaborative project with industry.

Both of these projects will place emphasis on industrial design students’ ability to be innovative and creative. The project that stresses a breakdown and analysis will demonstrate the worldwide nature of product manufacturing. This product will be disassembled with students during the first few class meetings and the instructor will point out the various shipping, outsourcing, materials, engineering and manufacturing capacities manifested by the product.

The project that addresses consumer electronics will require careful analysis and its documentation. This analysis will include a study of materials, form, function, use, scale, and user interface and user experience. The project will then culminate in a design that incorporates the traditional design process of sketches, form refinement, digital drafting, sketch models, final appearance model, and photo-documented booklet, suitable for client presentation and/or inclusion in a portfolio.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS251
3.0
DS342: Materials & Methods III
Materials & Methods III focuses on the processes used in industry for manufacturing consumer products. Building upon Materials & Methods I and II, students will in a comprehensive manner explore the characteristics, properties and appropriate use of materials for mass production of products made with thermoplastics and thermoset plastics and ferrous and non-ferrous metals.

This course involves a more academic approach to the study of materials and methods typical of manufacturing. This approach is oriented towards the study of common processes, their limits, and characteristics. Attention will be given to how materials are specified, how materials and methods of manufacture have common interfaces and how specific materials are linked to specific processes. To achieve the above, students will study materials and manufacturing methods from the class textbook, have access to the CES Edupack software, will view DVDs on materials and processes, and will attend field trips to off-campus sites to observe the manufacturing processes studied in the classroom.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS241
3.0
DS344: CAID I
Computer Applications for Industrial Design I is a first-semester junior course, which introduces the basic conventions and understandings of computer-aided drafting (CAD) and computer-aided industrial design (CAID). Emphasis is given to developing the potential of computers as engineering and technical illustration drawing tools, as well as the Cartesian Coordinate System as it applies to three-dimensional wire frame models.

Computer Applications for Industrial Design I draws from the student’s previous experience with technical descriptions of products or systems in their studies of perspective, orthographic drawing, rendering, the industrial design studio course work The elements and principles of control line drawing and computer- aided engineering drawing will be covered in depth using Solidworks.

Additionally, course work will be devoted to the essential components of wire frame drawing and three- dimensional solid modeling principles and surface development within the Cartesian Coordinate System.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS250 & DS252
3.0
DS352: Visualization Techniques II
In Visualization Techniques II, drawing skills presented in Visual Techniques I are developed further. Students will review perspective, shadow, rendering techniques and reflection theories. Attention is given to the accurate depiction of various materials and surfaces in a variety of media during the first semester.

This is the fourth course in a series of courses designed to develop the student’s ability to draw concepts and ideas in a professional studio environment. Students are instructed in specific techniques used to describe complex forms, surfaces and designs. This course addresses advanced techniques and skills applied to more challenging visual problems. Demonstrations will be made of different rendering media in class; including markers, pastels, colored pencils and opaque watercolors. Different types of surface media will be explored such as: bond, Canson, vellum, crescent board and newsprint.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS252
3.0
Required Major Courses: Spring
DS341: Industrial Design IV
Industrial Design IV continues to build upon the design process through design research, design thinking, analysis, problem solving and refinement of design skills with emphasis placed on the studentʼs ability to recognize and comprehend the responsibility of the designer to society at large.

The goal of Industrial Design IV is furthering the education of ID students through interaction with outside entities. Students are expected to work individually or in teams to provide ideas and concepts to problems presented by collaborative entities or individuals outside of MIAD.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS340
3.0
DS345: CAID II
Computer Applications for Industrial Design II is a Second-semester Solidworks course, which expands on the basic conventions and understandings of computer-aided drafting (CAD) and computer-aided industrial design (CAID). Emphasis is given to developing the potential of computers as engineering and technical illustration drawing tools, as well as the Cartesian Coordinate System as it applies to three-dimensional wire frame models.

Computer Applications for Industrial Design II draws from the student’s previous experience with technical descriptions of products or systems in their studies of perspective, orthographic drawing, rendering, the industrial design studio course work. The elements and principles of control line drawing and computer-aided engineering drawing will be covered in depth using Solidworks

Additionally, course work will be devoted to the essential components of wire frame drawing and three-dimensional solid modeling principles and surface development within the Cartesian Coordinate System.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS344
3.0
DS359: Human Factors
This course covers human factors, anthropometry and ergonomics. Emphasis is given to the interaction between consumer products, environments and their users (including the elderly and individuals with disabilities). For this course students are provided with a source of anthropometric data relevant to the nature of the design problems most frequently encountered in their future professional practice.

Ergonomics/human factors is a multi-disciplinary design science involving the gathering of information on peopleʼs physical capabilities for the purpose of designing products, medical equipment, workplaces, furniture, automobiles, motorcycles, etc. In the United States the military and aerospace industries were the first to use human factors principles in their designs. Today most branches of industry have understood that well-designed consumer products, equipment and workplaces improve productivity, safety and increase user satisfaction.

The terms ergonomics (from the Greek ERGO or work) and human factors are often used synonymously. Both describe the interaction between the user and the task or activities to be performed and both are concerned with trying to reduce unnecessary stress in the workplace and home or office environments.

Ergonomics has traditionally focused on how work affects people including their physiological responses from physically demanding work to environmental stressors such as heat, noise, illumination and visual monitoring tasks. In contrast, human factors as practiced in the United States focuses on peopleʼs behavior as they interact with consumer products, workplaces, on human size and strength. The emphasis of human factors is often on designs that reduce potential for human error such as on consumer products, interface design, medical equipment, furniture, automobile dashboards, aircraft cockpits, etc.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS344
3.0
Liberal Studies: Junior
WR300: The Creative Professional in Context
In The Creative Professional in Context, students explore the process of constructing a professional, public identity through written and verbal communication about their work in Fine Art and/or Design. They refine their skills in writing, speaking, and listening, and use writing as a means to examine the conceptual, critical, philosophical, and historical foundations of their emerging creative work within the broader contexts of their chosen fields and of visual culture broadly conceived.

In this course students learn to use writing as a means of effectively communicating ideas and information about their emerging professional identities. To these ends, students will write, edit and revise often; engage in self-directed research; analyze different rhetorical situations within the professional sphere; and refine their professional selves through both oral and written assignments. Instructors in WR300 employ frequent use of writing workshops and writing groups as well as individual writing assignments. Because the course is conducted in seminar fashion, students are expected to assume considerable responsibility for course materials and processes.

WR300 emphasizes the composition of polished, substantive written work, including description of studio work and processes, critical analysis of art/design texts, reflective writing, and communication with colleagues and peers. Assignments foster the development of a professional identity by engaging students in critical reading and discussion of key texts in visual culture and their major field, and identifying personal, cultural, and professional influences and connections that impact the student’s work. The course work will culminate in the creation of a substantive document representing a professional self, conceived in relation to these critical contexts.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): WR200
3.0
SC320/350/321: NS Elective
SC320 Topics in Natural Sciences description should be updated to reflect our current course offering:

SC320 is an advanced-level course that examines one of the many fields of Natural Sciences. Topics in Natural Science will rotate on a semester basis. Students will study the nature of scientific inquiry, the methods, theories, discoveries, technology, and language important to the specific field of science of their choosing. As part of the course, students will also conduct an independent inquiry utilizing the basis of scientific inquiry and research.

As an advanced course, SC320 builds upon skills and knowledge acquired in SC220. It is designed with the understanding that the coursework will focus on interpretation, analysis and critical method rather than on mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Students will examine a field of natural science through readings and lecture material from a variety of sources and from a range of scientific and critical opinion. The material and assignments will vary depending upon the field of natural sciences taught. This course can be retaken with change in topic for a 6 credits maximum.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): SC220

SC321: Topics in Natural Sciences – Field Experiences

As an advanced course, SC321 builds upon skills and knowledge acquired in SC220. It is designed with the understanding that the coursework will focus on interpretation, analysis and critical method rather than on mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Students will first examine the field of natural science through readings and lecture material from a variety of sources and from a range of scientific and critical opinion. Students will apply in the field the theoretical knowledge gained by a literature review, with direct inquiry and hands-on activities and investigations. This course relies heavily on field work, direct inquiry and self-directed independent research culminating with a peer-reviewed oral examination. Note: The field component of this course i9 days, located at offsite from MIAD.

Prerequisites: SC220 or equivalent and permission of the instructors.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): SC220
3.0
HU380: Service Learning
Service Learning is an interdisciplinary course with a service-learning component and is designed as the synthesis of a student’s four-year humanities and social science experience. In HU380 students will study a topic in-depth (i.e., cities, families, borders, aging, food) and be presented with many opportunities for interdisciplinary investigation. Through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments, students will analyze an issue in order to evaluate how social groups function and work towards resolution. Topics will be dealt with through scholarly and community investigations that may include sociology, psychology, anthropology, economics, political science, and history.

In HU380 students will have the opportunity to examine a social issue in depth, from a variety of perspectives. The coursework will focus on the historical and philosophical background of a given topic, as well as helping students to learn how to assess a variety of approaches to social systems through an examination of the nature of service in the community.

In the study of the social sciences, we examine patterns in our personal lives, the communities we live in, and a larger global context in order to see how they are connected. Through the in-depth study of a particular topic (i.e., food, cities, family, rivers, borders, aging), students will be able to analyze an issue in order to evaluate how social groups understand and work towards resolution. HU380 includes a service- learning component that is connected to the topic being studied. This will take place in the larger community, and it will allow students to examine the information they are learning through thinking and acting in a multicultural context.

Credits: 3
Prerequisite(s): HS121 and WR200 + Junior Standing
3.0
Students complete 15 each semester third year to complete degree requirements
SENIOR
Required Major Courses: Fallcredits
DS440: Industrial Design V
In Industrial Design V students will identify specific design needs or projects that become the basis for their design activities either in team or individual projects. Attention is given to all phases of the design process in advanced product design and to further develop their communication skills by presenting to visiting professionals.

Whenever possible students will work in teams when they participate in a collaborative project and/or a national student design competition endorsed by Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA), such as the International Housewares Association (IHA), the International Design Excellence Awards (IDEA) or others. Participation and placing in a design competition is an excellent benchmarking tool for the students versus others as well as a means to facilitate their entry in the profession.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS341
3.0
DS442: Industrial Design Professional Practice
Professional Practice is a first-semester senior level course that introduces the basic concept of business practices of industrial design. Through various materials, handouts and presentations by faculty or outside professionals, the students gain an understanding of their future profession’s business practices.

Industrial Design Professional Practice covers the following subject areas:
• The Code of Ethics and Standards of professional conduct and practices set by IDSA
• Consulting office versus corporate office practices
• Basic contracts for industrial design
• How to conduct an entry level job search
• How to interview as an entry level industrial designer
• Development of an entry-level designer's Curriculum Vitae (résumé) • Development of an entry-level portfolio and of a portfolio teaser
• Development of a business proposal and industrial design specific correspondence • Development of multi-phase budget
• Intellectual property protection: copyright, trademark, patent and design patent laws • Application methods and legal procedures for intellectual property protection

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS341
3.0
Required Major Courses: Spring
DS441: Industrial Design VI: Senior Project
This is the final course in the Industrial Design studio sequence. Students will undertake a 12-week final project that provides opportunities to develop and document advanced skills in problem solving and technical areas. Students will also concentrate on completing their design portfolio.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS440
3.0
DS451: Display & Exhibition Design
Display & Exhibition Design focuses primarily on trade shows and point-of-purchase systems. Emphasis is given to practical applications and budgeting.

The focus of this course is to give students a working awareness of exhibit design and exhibit systems, of display design, and POP (Point of Purchase) design processes. The application of design skills in this industry can offer graduates many opportunities. Exposure to the language, materials, technique, and pace of these disciplines through a number of projects in this course is expected to enhance the student’s portfolio. One of these projects will be to design a display using the same information that is given to professional designers.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS440
3.0
Studio Electives
3cr studio elective:
A studio elective is any studio course (art or design major course) within MIAD's entire Program of Study, as long as it not a requirement of the student's major, and as long as the student meets the prerequisite(s). In addition to required courses from all eleven majors, each semester MIAD offers various special electives with a range of topics.
3.0
Liberal Studies: Senior
WR400: Senior Writing Seminar
Senior Writing Seminar is an intensive capstone writing course run as a seminar examining the making of meaning through narrative; specifically, exploring forms of Life Writing. Students will study the various forms of “life writing” including: autobiography, memoir, new journalism and creative nonfiction. Through weekly written explorations, students will explore and practice the different forms that the genre of “life writing” may take. Within the context of a growing public popularity of autobiographical writing and memoirs, students will explore possible social, political and rhetorical purposes for writing from life and will compose a final, capstone life writing project individually as means for practicing this form of writing.

WR 400 is a capstone writing course that introduces students to emerging hybrid and intermodal forms of personal writing and causes them to analyze the contexts within which it is occurring. Through formal and informal written exercises, students will explore the capacity of language to help shape and give meaning and form to personal experiences, influences, individuals, achievements or landscapes. This writing should provide a reflective springboard for looking backward or for facing the future and determining larger contexts and meanings for experiences. It should also cause students to continue to develop more sophisticated skills as writers.

The
nature and form of the writing that students produce will be various –individual writers will complete intensely reflective responses to readings and to one another’s writing. In an effort to identify past memories and influences, material choices and intentions, important events and people, composing short and long pieces about those issues and individuals.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s):
WR300 & Senior standing
3.0
AH318: AH Elect
AH318 provides students the opportunity to give in-depth focus to a wide range of elective topics in Art History. Experience in the disciplines is broadened through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments. Among the topics which students may choose to study are courses such as: 19th Century American Masters; Early Chinese Art; Women, Art, and Society; The Bauhaus; The History of Industrial Design; and others.

AH318 is an advanced-level elective course in Art History. In AH318 students will undertake an in-depth and systematic investigation of one area of study in Art History. This topic may focus on the art of a geographic area or culture, a particular movement in the history of art, or on the life and work of one artist or group of artists. In each case, the course of study will include an extensive analysis of individual works of art, the cultures from which these emerged, and the critical discourse that helps us understand this art more clearly.

As an advanced-level course, AH318 is designed with the understanding that the coursework will feature interpretation, analysis and critical method rather than the mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Students will be presented with readings and lecture material from a variety of sources - and from a range of historic and critical literature on the topic under consideration. Each student will be expected to engage actively with course materials and methods.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): WR200 and AH212/213 or its equivalences
3.0
AH318: AH Elect
AH318 provides students the opportunity to give in-depth focus to a wide range of elective topics in Art History. Experience in the disciplines is broadened through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments. Among the topics which students may choose to study are courses such as: 19th Century American Masters; Early Chinese Art; Women, Art, and Society; The Bauhaus; The History of Industrial Design; and others.

AH318 is an advanced-level elective course in Art History. In AH318 students will undertake an in-depth and systematic investigation of one area of study in Art History. This topic may focus on the art of a geographic area or culture, a particular movement in the history of art, or on the life and work of one artist or group of artists. In each case, the course of study will include an extensive analysis of individual works of art, the cultures from which these emerged, and the critical discourse that helps us understand this art more clearly.

As an advanced-level course, AH318 is designed with the understanding that the coursework will feature interpretation, analysis and critical method rather than the mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Students will be presented with readings and lecture material from a variety of sources - and from a range of historic and critical literature on the topic under consideration. Each student will be expected to engage actively with course materials and methods.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): WR200 and AH212/213 or its equivalences
3.0
HU340: Topic in Humanities
Topic in Cultural Studies offers students a range of topics in the interdisciplinary study of cultural phenomena in various societies. Courses may draw on or combine the methods and perspectives of an array of disciplines, including literary theory, media theory, film/video studies, cultural anthropology, history, philosophy, political economy, communication, sociology, social theory, psychology, museum studies, art history, and the history, philosophy or sociology of science. Experience in the topic is broadened through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments. As an advanced-level course, HU360 is designed with the understanding that the coursework will feature interpretation, analysis, and critical method rather than mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Each student will be expected to engage actively with course materials and methods and contribute regularly to class discussions and/or oral collaborative efforts—such as focus groups and panel discussions—that relate to course material.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): HU121 and WR200
3.0
HU340: Topic in Humanities
Topic in Cultural Studies offers students a range of topics in the interdisciplinary study of cultural phenomena in various societies. Courses may draw on or combine the methods and perspectives of an array of disciplines, including literary theory, media theory, film/video studies, cultural anthropology, history, philosophy, political economy, communication, sociology, social theory, psychology, museum studies, art history, and the history, philosophy or sociology of science. Experience in the topic is broadened through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments. As an advanced-level course, HU360 is designed with the understanding that the coursework will feature interpretation, analysis, and critical method rather than mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Each student will be expected to engage actively with course materials and methods and contribute regularly to class discussions and/or oral collaborative efforts—such as focus groups and panel discussions—that relate to course material.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): HU121 and WR200
3.0
Students complete 15 credits each semester fourth year to complete degree requirements
120 credits minimum required to complete degree