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Program of Study - Time-Based Media

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Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (BFA) in Time-Based Media | Animation | Video

FOUNDATIONS
Required Major Courses: Fallcredits
F100: Observational Drawing
In Observational Drawing the student is introduced to the visual language of drawing. How the parts of the drawing relate to each other and to the composition as a whole are explored. Each student strives to develop perceptual and representational skills. The student will primarily use black-and-white media, though color and digital experiences will also be introduced. The course places emphasis on depicting the human form in space using nude models and also places emphasis on depicting objects and on articulating space.

Observational Drawing is a course in which the student develops drawing and composition skills. While experimentation and imaginative probing are honest and expected aspects of the process, the main thrust of the course is analytical seeing and drawing with a range of media. Formal elements such as line, value, space, proportion and composition are employed for both representational and expressive purposes. The student begins to develop personal "voice" from the act of drawing, mark-making and composing. This exploration is designed to help the student use the language with purpose. The course encourages the transfer of the processes and knowledge in their work, in other foundations courses, and at the advanced levels.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): None
3.0
F110: Visual & Color Dynamics
Visual & Color Dynamics is a problem-solving course in which the student investigates the dynamic visual forces involved in composing on a two-dimensional plane. Students explore the interrelationships of composition, process, perception, and intention. Color and light are also explored as a visual phenomenon, as a perceptual occurrence, as pigment with specific mixing properties, and as an element with powerful expressive and symbolic potential. Time, the fourth dimension, is investigated through problems dealing with simultaneity and sequentiality. The range of tools includes traditional materials/mediums and digital imaging. The course broadens the student’s skill level in idea development, research strategies, and technique through the exploration of the visual language in both a historical and contemporary context. Approximately one-half of the semester is spent working in a digital environment.

Visual & Color Dynamics examines the visual dynamics that influence and determine the impact of two- dimensional work. The problems assigned encourage inventive thinking through the implementation of a variety of ideation strategies. The theory and application of formal issues test the expressive potential of the visual language. This exploration is designed to help the student use the language with purpose, and with an understanding of the historical and contemporary context. It encourages the transfer of the processes and knowledge in the student’s work, in other foundations courses, and at the advanced levels.

The additional application of color theories to studio problems allows the student to investigate the physical, perceptual, psychological, expressive, and organizational properties of color. The student will investigate both subtractive models and additive models of color. In increasingly complex problems, the student will also be introduced to time as a visual issue.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): None
3.0
F120: Research, Practice and Methods
In Research, Practice, and Methods (R.P.M.) students investigate strategies for effective communication. Each course emphasizes process and creative problem solving – appropriately using subject matter and a variety of media as a means of examining conceptual goals. Students engage in critical inquiry and conduct in-depth research to promote the development of their own studio practice within a historical, cultural, and personal context. The student chooses selectives from a variety of offerings. 3 credits each. (May be repeated with change in topic for total of 6 credits.)

R.P.M. selectives deal with concepts fundamental to many disciplines. These courses focus on a specific theme or issue to contextualize the student’s learning and promote a deeper understanding of one’s personal creative process. Students actively engage in various research practices to develop critical thinking and nurture their commitment to communicating ideas in a substantive way. Form and media explored in R.P.M. courses vary depending on the Selective the student chooses.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): None
3.0
F130: Space, Forms & Materials
Space, Form & Materials is comprised of three-dimensional visual experiences and investigation in the interaction of forms in space. The course broadens the student’s skill level in idea development, research strategies, and material technique through hands-on experiments, projects, and in-depth discussions. The course projects employ a variety of materials and media and emphasize the exploration of the visual language in both a historical and contemporary context. Within the course, students receive an orientation to MIAD's 3D lab, including instruction in the proper and safe use of hand tools and power equipment.

The course presents a progressive study in the terminology, principles, techniques, and materials in three-dimensional thinking. The projects assigned encourage inventive thinking through the implementation of a variety of ideation strategies. The theory and application of three dimensional design issues test the expressive and communicative potential of the visual language. This exploration is designed to help the student use the visual language with purpose and with an understanding of the historical and contemporary context. It encourages the transfer of the processes and knowledge in the student’s work, in other foundations courses, and at the advanced levels.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): None
3.0
F140: Understanding the Visual I
In Understanding the Visual I, students will explore topics that are fundamental in all areas of art and design. Students will develop skills in research, presentation, critique and discussion that will foster critical thinking. Through initiating an historical and contemporary context for art and design, students will develop the ability to formulate arguments and defend positions relevant to today’s culture.

In Understanding the Visual I, students will consider the meanings of images and objects in their contemporary culture. Presentation skills will be developed through which students will be able to separate opinions from positions, and discover ways to defend specific selections and attending positions.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): None
1.5
Required Major Courses: Spring
F199: Intro to Advanced Study
Introduction to Advanced Study offers a unique and broad-based exposure in advanced-level art and design disciplines offered at MIAD. The philosophy behind Introduction to Advanced Study is to invite students to explore problem solving and ways of working within the majors. Students will be actively engaged in making as a mode of inquiry and will gain experience in both the conceptual basis for the disciplines as well as the practical processes of the disciplines studied. Faculty will offer a variety of course structures and themes.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F100, F110 & F130
3.0
F113/F115: Image & Drawing Concepts / Spatial Concepts
F113: Image & Drawing Concepts

In Image & Drawing Concepts, students further enhance the drawing and compositional skills that they began to develop in F100 and F110. The focus of the course is the investigation of visual language as they explore different ways to create images. Issues in sequence, seriality and time are examined. A variety of media is used as a way of broadening the understanding of drawing and image making.

As a continuation of the first semester 2D courses, Image & Drawing Concepts allows the student to explore multiple ways to create images. This is accomplished through the investigation of a variety of concepts, processes, and materials that include experimental use of media/methods. Traditional boundaries between drawing and other disciplines will be blurred. The contextual and expressive use of color is an integral component of the course. The course strives to make drawing and other image making relevant to real world applications in the contemporary design and fine art realms.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F110 and F100 (or advanced placement)


F115: Spatial Concepts

In
Spatial Concepts the student continues three-dimensional visual experiences and investigation in the interaction of forms in space. Idea development, research strategies, and material techniques are advanced through hands on experiments, projects, and in-depth discussions. The projects are designed to allow the student to engage in various design and fine art processes and critically examine the effectiveness of presentation.

Spatial Concepts is an exploratory studio class that develops an informed understanding of three- dimensional form. The course presents a progressive study in the terminology, principles, techniques, and materials used in the development and interaction of three-dimensional forms. It is the objective of the course to develop within each student a deeper understanding of the terms and principles defining the context of form and a proficiency in the application of those elements to the creation of three-dimensional form. It encourages the transfer of the processes and knowledge in the student’s work, in other foundations courses, and at the advanced levels.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F130
3.0
F121: Research, Practice and Methods
In Research, Practice, and Methods (R.P.M.) students investigate strategies for effective communication. Each course emphasizes process and creative problem solving – appropriately using subject matter and a variety of media as a means of examining conceptual goals. Students engage in critical inquiry and conduct in-depth research to promote the development of their own studio practice within a historical, cultural, and personal context. The student chooses selectives from a variety of offerings. 3 credits each. (May be repeated with change in topic for total of 6 credits.)

R.P.M. selectives deal with concepts fundamental to many disciplines. These courses focus on a specific theme or issue to contextualize the student’s learning and promote a deeper understanding of one’s personal creative process. Students actively engage in various research practices to develop critical thinking and nurture their commitment to communicating ideas in a substantive way. Form and media explored in R.P.M. courses vary depending on the Selective the student chooses.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): None
3.0
F141: Understanding the Visual II
We live in an increasingly visual culture: what we see shapes how we think, and what we think shapes how we see. Understanding the Visual II will focus on how all images and objects comprise our visual culture, and how everything in visual culture is encoded with meaning, not only in its creation, but also from the context in which a viewer experiences it. Students will develop an understanding of how contemporary culture constructs, understands, and uses images and objects through an examination of contemporary art and design.

As an introductory exploration of contemporary visual culture, this course will prepare students to contextualize and apply critical standards to any image or object they encounter, including an examination of their own work through the development of a digital portfolio. Students will explore how visual culture is constantly changing and use this awareness as an opportunity to discuss their lives as creators and the future of art and design. They will also learn how to engage in critique as an example of a deeper mode of inquiry about their own work and the work of others.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): F140
1.5
Liberal Studies: Foundations
WR120: The Word and the World
The World and the Word course is an introduction to academic writing at the college level. Students will engage in an intensive practice of critical reading, thinking and writing through the examination of a variety of topics and genre in a collaborative atmosphere. Students will create a written self-assessment at the end of the semester.

In this course, students will use writing as a means by which to improve their ability to read meaningfully and to understand the profound connection between oral and written language and the world in which they live. Four parts of the writing and learning process are stressed: reading, writing, speaking and listening.

Students will read and write about subjects both academic and non-academic, and explore the various ways writers engage their audiences in particular contexts. In doing so, they will learn to see and evaluate their own rhetorical choices in a range of writing situations. Through the course of the semester, students write often and in many forms: in journals, online, formally and informally. Further, they will practice all steps of the writing process, including researching a topic, assessing the context and audience of a particular assignment, and developing early drafts into refined essays.

Speaking and listening are just as fundamental as reading and writing to the student-centered activities that form the core of this course. Students will practice articulating their ideas in class discussion and attending closely to those of their peers, further developing their own perspectives. Through workshops and writing groups, students will analyze one another’s writing and practice revision and editing. Students also participate in small group work, collaborative writing, conferences, and research. These activities stress how writing can be practiced in communities as well as on one's own; they will demonstrate that writing, like learning, is simultaneously solitary and social, private and public.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): None
3.0
AH151: Prehistory - 1900
Topics in Historical Art: Prehistory to 1900 is a course in which a number of themes in historical Western art are examined and addressed through east-west cultural connections and artistic exchanges. Key art objects in cultural periods from prehistoric times through the nineteenth century will be the focus of study. Through intensive reading, writing, and oral projects, students will learn to identify and discuss key works of art utilizing appropriate terminology by artistic, cultural, and critical criteria. In the course, students will engage in activities centering on inquiry, observation, description, analysis, and research of art objects.

AH151 is a topical study of art from prehistory through the nineteenth century, and will focus primarily on Western art, East- West cultural exchanges, and the influence of Non-Western art and ideas on the art in the west. Focus will center on art objects from different cultures and periods within this time frame and the historical contexts in which they were created. Because art and ideas are considered equally important, reading and analysis of primary and other texts, along with the study of images and original works are basic to AH151 coursework. The texts will help provide an aesthetic, social-cultural, and critical framework for studying these creators and their objects. As part of this course, students will have the opportunity to examine the lives of many significant creative figures, the influences of their personalities on the art of their time, and the artistic movements of which they were a part. In the course, students will utilize inquiry, observation, description, analysis, and research as key tools to engage specific works, historical periods, and cultural contexts.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): None
3.0
HU121: Human Thought and Action
Human Thought and Action introduces multiple ideas, disciplines, and forms of making meaning. It serves as an introduction to humanist inquiry, focusing on critical thinking, the analysis of ideas, formulating questions, and the interconnectedness of knowledge and the various disciplines.
The philosophical, historical, theological, psychological, and sociological narratives created by humans form the structure of our lives. Human Thought and Action investigates the human meaning-making impulse and the articulation of human ideas and experiences through various disciplines.

HU121 is an interdisciplinary inquiry into human thought, action and reaction. In this course, teachers and students will examine the way that humanist knowledge and processes have influenced humankind’s perception of self through millennia. As a prerequisite for the upper-level humanities courses, HU121 focuses on significant forms of knowledge and ontological questions. Students will be challenged to reflect upon and discuss definitions of group problem-solving activities, “community,” cultural literacy, and the importance of human action and witness to a culture.
Through study of specific texts, students will explore the way that humans have borne witness to their experiences and sought to find meaning in them in various ways. Students will explore different views on the human experience through familiar activities – close reading of primary and secondary texts, class discussions, inquiry journals and take-home essays and transactional writing, participation in public events in the MIAD community, field trips, and on-site research.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): WR111 or WR120
3.0
Students complete 16.5 credits each semester foundations year to complete degree requirements in four years33 CREDITS
SOPHOMORE
Required Major Courses: Fallcredits
TB200: Animation I
Animation I is an introduction to the basics of animation, principles that can be applied to a wide variety of styles and technologies. Students will explore the unique qualities of the medium through a series of projects that can be adapted to their own personal interests. The course will provide the student with a foundation of skills that will prepare them for further study in the field.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F113/F115
3.0
TB202: Video I
Video I is an introductory course that deals with time, movement and sound as they relate to the media of video. Narrative, as a structuring component in a video, is also considered and explored. This course uses a variety of hardware and software for post-production editing.

Credits:
Prerequisite(s): F113/F115
3.0
TB204: Introduction to Sound
Introduction to Sound examines techniques and applications of sound as a component of time and motion based media as well as a stand-alone medium. A variety of technical, aesthetic and conceptual issues relating to sound recording and editing will be explored in depth. The impact of sound and it’s relationship to image will be explored and tested through studio projects designed to introduce the student to some of the major modes of working with sound in the art and design fields.

Sound can be used to produce stand-alone works that create images in our minds. Often overlooked in theory and history, sound can hold as much impact on the mind of a listener as the most compelling of moving images. This course will examine techniques and applications of sound as a singular medium as well as a component of time and motion based media. Students will consider the historical, physiological and psychological impact of sound on an audience during exercises designed to sensitize them to their aural environment and through projects emulating some of the most common applications of sound in the field of time based media.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F113/F115
3.0
Required Major Courses: Spring
200-Level TBM Course
The content of this course varies from semester to semester, depending upon proposals put forward by interested faculty. The underlying principle, however, is to enrich the core course of study. Exploring special topics, working with outstanding practitioners and delving into experimental offshoots will broaden the students’ experience in time based media.
3.0
200-Level TBM Course
The content of this course varies from semester to semester, depending upon proposals put forward by interested faculty. The underlying principle, however, is to enrich the core course of study. Exploring special topics, working with outstanding practitioners and delving into experimental offshoots will broaden the students’ experience in time based media.
3.0
Studio Electives
Studio Elective
A studio elective is any studio course (art or design major course) within MIAD's entire Program of Study, as long as it not a requirement of the student's major, and as long as the student meets the prerequisite(s). In addition to required courses from all eleven majors, each semester MIAD offers various special electives with a range of topics.
3.0
Studio Elective
A studio elective is any studio course (art or design major course) within MIAD's entire Program of Study, as long as it not a requirement of the student's major, and as long as the student meets the prerequisite(s). In addition to required courses from all eleven majors, each semester MIAD offers various special electives with a range of topics.
3.0
Liberal Studies: Sophomore
WR200: Critical and Creative Forms
Critical and Creative Forms is an intermediate-level writing course that focuses on writing as a creative and critical form. Students will explore the formal qualities of a variety of “texts,” including visual and online texts, and expand their experience of writing analytically and creatively. It is an intensification of the processes introduced in WR120 with further emphasis on visual as well as verbal rhetorics and critical thinking.

In WR200, students will develop their ability to read and assess communication in various forms and genres, to write analytical and critical essays, to perform increasingly sophisticated research, and to experiment with communicative form themselves. WR200 focuses on the theme of “environments,” examining the idea or condition of “environment” through a variety of possible progressive lenses, including ecological, natural, cultural, sacred or built environments.

WR200 emphasizes writing-in-process and students are challenged to take progressively more individual responsibility for all phases of the process, from journaling to the composing of final manuscripts. Students will be expected to identify, research and articulate points of view with increasing sophistication and ease in order to engage in critical conversations. Students participate in writing workshops, writing groups, small group discussions and collaborative writing as well as complete individual writing assignments. Throughout, students will be required to demonstrate evolving critical judgment and self- reflection. Self-directed research and working proficiently with primary and secondary sources is also emphasized through assignments highlighting the research process and the creation of an annotated bibliography.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): WR120 or WR111
3.0
SC220: Intro to Biology
The Introduction to Natural Sciences is a sophomore level course required of all students for graduation. In this course students will study the nature of the scientific method and examine basic biological, ecological and environmental concepts. These examinations are broadened through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments.

In SC220 students will study the nature of the scientific method and examine significant biological concepts. SC220 will explore science and natural world themes in order to:
1. Understand science as a way of questioning, testing, and explaining the world;
2. Science and technology as a reciprocal relationship that evolves through time;
3. Enable students to make educated decisions regarding biological and environmental issues;
4. Enable students to function as responsible citizens of the world.

This course is designed with the understanding that coursework will feature interpretation, analysis and critical thinking rather than the mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Each student will be expected to engage actively with course materials.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): none
3.0
AH212 or AH213: History of Modernism - Fine Art/Design
The History of Modernism: Design outlines major styles and trends in communication design, illustration, industrial design, architecture and interior architecture & design, from the beginning of the industrial period to the present. Through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments, students have the opportunity to study the philosophical, social, cultural and commercial concerns of such primary movements as Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, Bauhaus, Art Deco and Post Modernism within Europe, the United States and Japan.

AH213 will provide students with an historical perspective of the designer’s world since the beginning of the 19th century. Students will gain an understanding of the major figures, movements and styles in design that have emerged since the beginning of the modern industrial period, and of the social and cultural forces that are the basis of the evolving craft of the designer. While significant emphasis will be placed on design of the recent past, students will be required to demonstrate understanding of the relationship between recent trends in design and the traditions from which they emerged. AH213 emphasizes the critical process and stresses writing as a primary means of demonstrating knowledge in these areas. Strong emphasis will be placed on all manifestations of modern and contemporary design as it concerns both two and three-dimensional forms.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): WR120 and AH151 or equivalencies
3.0
Students complete 15 credits each semester sophomore year to complete degree requirements in four years30 CREDITS
JUNIOR
Required Major Courses: Fallcredits
300-Level TBM Course
The content of this course varies from semester to semester, depending upon proposals put forward by interested faculty. The underlying principle, however, is to enrich the core course of study. Exploring special topics, working with outstanding practitioners and delving into experimental offshoots will broaden the students’ experience in time based media.
3.0
300-Level TBM Course
The content of this course varies from semester to semester, depending upon proposals put forward by interested faculty. The underlying principle, however, is to enrich the core course of study. Exploring special topics, working with outstanding practitioners and delving into experimental offshoots will broaden the students’ experience in time based media.
3.0
Required Major Courses: Spring
300-Level TBM Course
The content of this course varies from semester to semester, depending upon proposals put forward by interested faculty. The underlying principle, however, is to enrich the core course of study. Exploring special topics, working with outstanding practitioners and delving into experimental offshoots will broaden the students’ experience in time based media.
3.0
300-Level TBM Course
The content of this course varies from semester to semester, depending upon proposals put forward by interested faculty. The underlying principle, however, is to enrich the core course of study. Exploring special topics, working with outstanding practitioners and delving into experimental offshoots will broaden the students’ experience in time based media.
3.0
Studio Electives
Studio Elective
A studio elective is any studio course (art or design major course) within MIAD's entire Program of Study, as long as it not a requirement of the student's major, and as long as the student meets the prerequisite(s). In addition to required courses from all eleven majors, each semester MIAD offers various special electives with a range of topics.
3.0
Studio Elective
A studio elective is any studio course (art or design major course) within MIAD's entire Program of Study, as long as it not a requirement of the student's major, and as long as the student meets the prerequisite(s). In addition to required courses from all eleven majors, each semester MIAD offers various special electives with a range of topics.
3.0
Liberal Studies: Junior
WR300: The Creative Professional in Context
In The Creative Professional in Context, students explore the process of constructing a professional, public identity through written and verbal communication about their work in Fine Art and/or Design. They refine their skills in writing, speaking, and listening, and use writing as a means to examine the conceptual, critical, philosophical, and historical foundations of their emerging creative work within the broader contexts of their chosen fields and of visual culture broadly conceived.

In this course students learn to use writing as a means of effectively communicating ideas and information about their emerging professional identities. To these ends, students will write, edit and revise often; engage in self-directed research; analyze different rhetorical situations within the professional sphere; and refine their professional selves through both oral and written assignments. Instructors in WR300 employ frequent use of writing workshops and writing groups as well as individual writing assignments. Because the course is conducted in seminar fashion, students are expected to assume considerable responsibility for course materials and processes.

WR300 emphasizes the composition of polished, substantive written work, including description of studio work and processes, critical analysis of art/design texts, reflective writing, and communication with colleagues and peers. Assignments foster the development of a professional identity by engaging students in critical reading and discussion of key texts in visual culture and their major field, and identifying personal, cultural, and professional influences and connections that impact the student’s work. The course work will culminate in the creation of a substantive document representing a professional self, conceived in relation to these critical contexts.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): WR200
3.0
HU340/360 Topics in Cultural Studies
Topic in Cultural Studies offers students a range of topics in the interdisciplinary study of cultural phenomena in various societies. Courses may draw on or combine the methods and perspectives of an array of disciplines, including literary theory, media theory, film/video studies, cultural anthropology, history, philosophy, political economy, communication, sociology, social theory, psychology, museum studies, art history, and the history, philosophy or sociology of science. Experience in the topic is broadened through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments. As an advanced-level course, HU360 is designed with the understanding that the coursework will feature interpretation, analysis, and critical method rather than mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Each student will be expected to engage actively with course materials and methods and contribute regularly to class discussions and/or oral collaborative efforts—such as focus groups and panel discussions—that relate to course material.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): HU121 and WR200
3.0
SC320/350/321: Natural Science Elective
Topics in Natural Science

SC320 is an advanced-level course that examines one of the many fields of Natural Sciences. Topics in Natural Science will rotate on a semester basis. Students will study the nature of scientific inquiry, the methods, theories, discoveries, technology, and language important to the specific field of science of their choosing. As part of the course, students will also conduct an independent inquiry utilizing the basis of scientific inquiry and research.
As an advanced course, SC320 builds upon skills and knowledge acquired in SC220. It is designed with the understanding that the coursework will focus on interpretation, analysis and critical method rather than on mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Students will examine a field of natural science through readings and lecture material from a variety of sources and from a range of scientific and critical opinion. The material and assignments will vary depending upon the field of natural sciences taught.

This course can be retaken with change in topic for a 6 credits maximum.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): SC220
3.0
HU380: Service Learning
Service Learning is an interdisciplinary course with a service-learning component and is designed as the synthesis of a student’s four-year humanities and social science experience. In HU380 students will study a topic in-depth (i.e., cities, families, borders, aging, food) and be presented with many opportunities for interdisciplinary investigation. Through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments, students will analyze an issue in order to evaluate how social groups function and work towards resolution. Topics will be dealt with through scholarly and community investigations that may include sociology, psychology, anthropology, economics, political science, and history.

In HU380 students will have the opportunity to examine a social issue in depth, from a variety of perspectives. The coursework will focus on the historical and philosophical background of a given topic, as well as helping students to learn how to assess a variety of approaches to social systems through an examination of the nature of service in the community.

In the study of the social sciences, we examine patterns in our personal lives, the communities we live in, and a larger global context in order to see how they are connected. Through the in-depth study of a particular topic (i.e., food, cities, family, rivers, borders, aging), students will be able to analyze an issue in order to evaluate how social groups understand and work towards resolution. HU380 includes a service- learning component that is connected to the topic being studied. This will take place in the larger community, and it will allow students to examine the information they are learning through thinking and acting in a multicultural context.

Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): HS121 and WR200 + Junior Standing
4.0
Students complete 15/16 {w/HU380} each semester junior year to complete degree requirements31 CREDITS
SENIOR
Required Major Courses: Fallcredits
TB400: Time-Based Media Thesis
During the first half of this yearlong undertaking, the student, in consultation with the instructor and others, will define a starting point for the thesis project. The project will be substantial. It will exhibit personal vision and it will be professionally executed. The initial definition will be tested through rigorous examination of the artwork produced. New directions or productive tangents may be identified and pursued as the semester progresses. By the end of the semester, students will have created a substantial body of work reflecting an ever more refined grasp of their thesis project.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): Senior Standing in Time-Based Media
3.0
Studio Elective
A studio elective is any studio course (art or design major course) within MIAD's entire Program of Study, as long as it not a requirement of the student's major, and as long as the student meets the prerequisite(s). In addition to required courses from all eleven majors, each semester MIAD offers various special electives with a range of topics.
3.0
Required Major Courses: Springcredits
TB401: Time-Based Media Thesis
During the second half of this yearlong undertaking, the student, in consultation with the instructor and others, will complete a thesis project. The project will be substantial. It will exhibit personal vision and it will be professionally executed. The course divides into two segments. Segment one involves completion of the thesis project. Segment two involves exhibition of the work. Both segments will consist of high caliber, professional quality artwork. The students will have demonstrated an emerging personal direction.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): TB 400 or Instructor Approval
3.0
TB403: Time-Based Media Professional Practice
Time-Based Media Professional Practice offers an overview of the field of time-based media and prepares the student for entry into the professional world. The course addresses job and business opportunities as well as application procedures in the applied and fine arts field of time based media. Students will discuss current events, produce a television program for commercial broadcast, refine their resumes, demo reels and artist statements and address copyright issues, grant applications, festival submissions and the formation of limited liability corporations.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): TB400
3.0
Studio Electives
Studio Elective
A studio elective is any studio course (art or design major course) within MIAD's entire Program of Study, as long as it not a requirement of the student's major, and as long as the student meets the prerequisite(s). In addition to required courses from all eleven majors, each semester MIAD offers various special electives with a range of topics.
3.0
Studio Elective
A studio elective is any studio course (art or design major course) within MIAD's entire Program of Study, as long as it not a requirement of the student's major, and as long as the student meets the prerequisite(s). In addition to required courses from all eleven majors, each semester MIAD offers various special electives with a range of topics.
3.0
Liberal Studies: Senior
AH217: Contemporary Issues in Time-Based Media
3.0
WR400: Senior Writing Seminar
Senior Writing Seminar is an intensive capstone writing course run as a seminar examining the making of meaning through narrative; specifically, exploring forms of Life Writing. Students will study the various forms of “life writing” including: autobiography, memoir, new journalism and creative nonfiction. Through weekly written explorations, students will explore and practice the different forms that the genre of “life writing” may take. Within the context of a growing public popularity of autobiographical writing and memoirs, students will explore possible social, political and rhetorical purposes for writing from life and will compose a final, capstone life writing project individually as means for practicing this form of writing.

WR 400 is a capstone writing course that introduces students to emerging hybrid and intermodal forms of personal writing and causes them to analyze the contexts within which it is occurring. Through formal and informal written exercises, students will explore the capacity of language to help shape and give meaning and form to personal experiences, influences, individuals, achievements or landscapes. This writing should provide a reflective springboard for looking backward or for facing the future and determining larger contexts and meanings for experiences. It should also cause students to continue to develop more sophisticated skills as writers.

The
nature and form of the writing that students produce will be various –individual writers will complete intensely reflective responses to readings and to one another’s writing. In an effort to identify past memories and influences, material choices and intentions, important events and people, composing short and long pieces about those issues and individuals.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s):
WR300 & Senior standing
3.0
AH318: AH Elective
AH318 provides students the opportunity to give in-depth focus to a wide range of elective topics in Art History. Experience in the disciplines is broadened through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments. Among the topics which students may choose to study are courses such as: 19th Century American Masters; Early Chinese Art; Women, Art, and Society; The Bauhaus; The History of Industrial Design; and others.

AH318 is an advanced-level elective course in Art History. In AH318 students will undertake an in-depth and systematic investigation of one area of study in Art History. This topic may focus on the art of a geographic area or culture, a particular movement in the history of art, or on the life and work of one artist or group of artists. In each case, the course of study will include an extensive analysis of individual works of art, the cultures from which these emerged, and the critical discourse that helps us understand this art more clearly.

As an advanced-level course, AH318 is designed with the understanding that the coursework will feature interpretation, analysis and critical method rather than the mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Students will be presented with readings and lecture material from a variety of sources - and from a range of historic and critical literature on the topic under consideration. Each student will be expected to engage actively with course materials and methods.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): WR200 and AH212/213 or its equivalences
3.0
HU340/360 Topics in Cultural Studies
Topic in Cultural Studies offers students a range of topics in the interdisciplinary study of cultural phenomena in various societies. Courses may draw on or combine the methods and perspectives of an array of disciplines, including literary theory, media theory, film/video studies, cultural anthropology, history, philosophy, political economy, communication, sociology, social theory, psychology, museum studies, art history, and the history, philosophy or sociology of science. Experience in the topic is broadened through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments. As an advanced-level course, HU360 is designed with the understanding that the coursework will feature interpretation, analysis, and critical method rather than mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Each student will be expected to engage actively with course materials and methods and contribute regularly to class discussions and/or oral collaborative efforts—such as focus groups and panel discussions—that relate to course material.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): HU121 and WR200
3.0
Students complete 15 credits each semester senior year to complete degree requirements30 CREDITS
124 credits minimum required to complete degree124 CREDITS TOTAL

Download the 2013-14 Program of Study Catalog, with every Major and all course descriptions.

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