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Degree Courses - Sculpture

DS240: Materials & Methods I
Materials & Methods I builds upon the development of design process with attention to the refinement of design skills through efficient research, analysis, problem-solving and project development. Emphasis is placed on the student’s ability to recognize and comprehend the responsibility of the designer to society at large.

This course focuses on the skills required to fulfill specific conceptual objectives using a variety of materials and processes. Students will use the design processes of concept drawing, pattern making, and mock-ups to design original work which becomes the basis for the establishment of skills criteria. Assimilation of information from lectures, demonstrations, hand-outs and studio experiences will be evident as students execute a series of increasingly sophisticated shapes, forms in woods, metals, plastics and composition materials. Emphasis is placed on the safe and intelligent use of tools particularly stationary power equipment. e.g., machines that cut, drill, spot-weld, grind and finish. Techniques of fabrication of designed objects will be explored such as cut plans and layouts, proper location of drilling holes, riveting and finishing for example. Mass production methods will be explored and developed for the last project and developed for sale at MIAD in the Design Factory.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F130 & F113/F115


FA250: Traditions of Making: Wood
Traditions of Making: Wood investigates specific sculpture techniques, methods, philosophical concerns, and ways of seeing/working that give personal expression to material form. The shaping of permanent materials such as wood and stone by reductive approaches conceptually contrasts and complements problems in introductory casting of metals and other materials. Demonstrations, lectures, field trips, readings and critiques will develop the students awareness of historical precedents and contemporary sculpture issues. Consideration of the interrelationships among form, material, technique and content will hone students’ ability to analyze their own and others work in critiques.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F113/F115


FA251: Traditions of Making: Metal
Traditions in Making: Metal is structured to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the process of casting metal and direct metal fabrication. The material transformation that takes place in the foundry during the process of casting metal contrasts and complements the manual techniques, and methods of direct metal fabrication. Metal fabrication and foundry work share many of the same tools and techniques, however each of these traditions of making ask sculptors to think in different ways. Appropriate use of the inherent qualities of process and materials is stressed. As choice of process and material are ideological decisions. Students will be encouraged to develop a knowledge and respect for the tools, techniques and material of choice.

A range of metal working tools, methods and techniques will be introduced and demonstrated through out the semester. A fundamental understanding of MIAD’s foundry and metal working area will include: oxy- acetylene and ARC, and MIG welding; hot and cold metal cutting and forming techniques; wax working: piece molds and introduction to investments; chasing, patina and finishing processes. Lectures, field trips, readings and critiques will develop the students’ awareness of historical precedents and contemporary sculpture issues. Consideration of the interrelationships among form, material, technique and content will hone students’ ability to analyze their own and others’ work in critiques.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F113/F115


FA252: Figure Sculpture
In Figure Sculpture, a foundation of figurative realism will be achieved by learning anatomy, proportion, structure, pose and gesture with an awareness of historical precedents. Diverse exercises in interpreting the figure as planes, volumes, mass, structure, and movement open the potential of human form whether realistic, abstracted, or metaphorical. Self - portraiture is used as a vehicle for exploring ones own nature as an artist.

Students begin by mastering manual/perceptual skills of direct rendering in clay from live models to understand human form in three dimensions. Clay plasticity facilitates dynamic liveliness and individual expression. Basic methods of hand building such as coil, slab construction, and modeling are explored -- followed by firing and finishing. Attention to surface, texture and finish will be measured against questions of credibility, purpose. The course includes mold-making and casting. Weekly investigations of materials, techniques and content will be engaged through demonstrations, slide lectures, discussions and critiques.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F113/F115


FA253: Alternative Media
The student will explore assemblage, installation, light, kinetics, multi-media and new genre as embraced in contemporary sculptural language in Alternative Media. Specific problems are preceded by readings, demonstrations of newer materials/processes, perceptual workshops, and experimental exercises. Acquisition of technical skills will be driven by the student’s personal vision and guidance from the instructor. Conceptual understanding will emerge from the production of the student’s own work, in conjunction with the application of a range of critical models.

This course will focus mainly on the immaterial aspects of sculpture, and will ask the questions, “What is alternative media and why am I using it?” Students will also be introduced to various ways of working in sculptural media, such as direct, collaborative, intuitive, accidental, etc. Assignments will present a group of ideas followed by an opportunity for students to propose artwork that fits within the student’s own range of interests and goals, thus contributing to their personal portfolios. Research combined with personal questioning and exploration will be emphasized.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s):


FA256: Contemporary Practices: Sculpture
Contemporary Practices in Sculpture is both an introduction to sculpture and the backbone of our program. Our major objective is to identify sculptural core concerns and sculpture’s expansive reach into all aspects of contemporary art. Building inquiry, research and interpretation into the practice of making art is the focus of this class. The combined sophomore and junior levels will:
• foster a climate of inquiry and discovery from varying perspectives, levels and depths
• gather, share and understand differing roles of skills; provide opportunities to challenge presumptions and
learn from one another through mentoring
• explore and cultivate dimensions of the art community.

Contemporary sculpture concerns will be related to historical precedence and larger cultural conversations. Aesthetic, conceptual and philosophical issues relating to the discipline of sculpture will be investigated through discussions, writing assignments, readings and coordinated studio projects. Students will create ePortfolios that parallel their working process with a continuing dialogue that resonates with their personal research topics.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F113/F115


FA351: Integrated Sculpture Studio
In Integrated Studio Sculpture students refine their personal artistic direction and increase their understanding of the relationships between formal, conceptual and contextual aspects of sculpture. Examining their own working process in relation to current options allows students to expand their thinking and their perspective while developing their work. Students will learn to craft a well-considered written proposal for a semester-long investigation. ePortfolios will become effective tools to assess working process, document studio projects, and deepen in application continued personal research and dialogue with contemporary art and culture.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F111


FA353: Topics in Figure
Students will begin to develop personal figure-based work while weighing and debating questions of the human body. Ongoing discourses in cultural meaning in anatomy, medicine and scientific inquiry will open expressive content from aspects of human experience such as psychology and neurology, health and disease, gender and identity. Technical/material fluency will be achieved by focusing on self-directed work such as an investigative series or a life size full figure with attendant studies or large installation. Student proposals and exhibitions provide a basis for debate and reference for critiques.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FA252 or 6 credits in figure studies


FA354/FA357: Material Aesthetic
In FA354 Materials Aesthetic students study and practice in-depth traditional and modern Lost Wax Processes of casting bronze and other metals. Fostering technical competence deepens control of the medium and opens larger dialogues of personal inquiry and expression. Methods of wax-working (modeling, shaping, molding, constructing) will be used to translate ideas/feelings into form. Then foundry practices (investing, metal casting, finishing and patinas) make those forms richly permanent. More ambitious work can be proposed and realized as advanced students become attuned to the resonance of the medium. Critiques are measures of progress.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): determined by specific course (junior-level sculpture standing)

FA357 Materials Aesthetic provides an opportunity for students to focus on the potential of glass as an expressive medium. Students will explore a range of processes: fusing, slumping, paté verre and kiln-casting. Emphasis will be on the unique properties of glass for color and form whether for functional or purely expressionistic purpose. Although this course is designed to increase the student's knowledge and technical mastery of material, the choice of method and material are ideological decisions. Therefore, students will be responsible for discussing the interrelationships among content, form, material and technique in their projects and the projects of their peers. Using glass with other materials as an element in finished work will be one of several projects.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): determined by specific course (junior-level sculpture standing)


FA355: Art in Public Places
Working in the public realm or fulfilling commission work offers added horizons for artists in any medium. In Art & Public Places students will create pieces in both permanent and transitory mediums supported by drawings, proposals and documentation. Concurrent with each assignment will be experiences that involve practical and technical communication, budgets, community and/or political challenges that extend beyond the studio. Field trips, visiting artists, architects and city planners augment class presentations.

One of the most exciting ways for designers and fine artists to come together is in the creation of spaces that that resonate with shared vision and energy. Students will develop detailed proposals in concert with the redesigning and renovation of the Student Union and MIAD’s attendant exterior spaces that will involve a real amalgamation of skill sets and perspective: sculpture, interior architecture + design, environmental graphics, furniture, lighting design, landscape, painting (mural and otherwise). Students will learn to work in teams that maximize well-considered diverse approaches to propose a unique, dynamic new environment.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): determined by specific course (junior-level sculpture standing)


FA356: Contemporary Practices: Sculpture II
Contemporary Practices in Sculpture is both an introduction to sculpture and the backbone of our program. Our major objective is to identify sculptural core concerns and sculpture’s expansive reach into all aspects of contemporary art. Building inquiry, research and interpretation into the practice of making art is the focus of this class. The combined sophomore and junior levels will:
• foster a climate of inquiry and discovery from varying perspectives, levels and depths
• gather, share and understand differing roles of skills; provide opportunities to challenge presumptions and
learn from one another through mentoring
• explore and cultivate dimensions of the art community.

Advanced students will participate in the design of the course by identifying and investigating critical, complicated relationships among contemporary sculptural forms, choices of materials, modes of production, language and distribution. An added emphasis on professional practices in sculpture will further expand understanding of current art worlds. Questions such as how to make a living, how to navigate and contextualize ones practice, how to be part of a dialogue and engage in different conversations will be explored through a combination of critiques, site visits, exhibitions and conversations with visiting artists, critics, and other arts professionals.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FA256


FA358: Topics in the Expanded Field
In this special topic course, students will explore a shared single contemporary theme or issue through diverse, personal sculptural practices. The advantages of shared investigation upon individual conceptual growth will challenge the choices one makes in materializing ideas into new forms. Since the medium is open, the instructor will give technical assistance on a case basis. Critical questions about intent, context, discovery and meaning will be emphasized.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): determined by specific course (junior-level sculpture standing)


FA453: Topics in Figure
Students will continue to develop personal figure-based work while weighing and debating questions of the human body. Ongoing discourses in cultural meaning in anatomy, medicine and scientific inquiry will open expressive content from aspects of human experience such as psychology and neurology, health and disease, gender and identity. Technical/material fluency will be achieved by focusing on self-directed work such as an investigative series or a life size full figure with attendant studies or large installation. Student proposals and exhibitions provide a basis for debate and reference for critiques.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing with 6 credits in figure studies


FA454: Material Aesthetic
This course is for the senior student who is interested in focusing on advanced foundry methods. If a senior decides to connect their work in Foundry with their thesis exhibition, a written proposal approved by both instructors must be turned in by the second week of the semester. FA451 students will serve as models and mentors to FA351 students in developing and refining their technical knowledge. The required ePortfolio will be a cogent document representing the student’s full engagement and be part of a final report articulating how their work in this course relates to the student’s senior thesis and goals for professional practice.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): determined by specific course (senior-level sculpture standing)


FA455: Art in Public Places
Working in the public realm or fulfilling commission work offers added horizons for artists in any medium. Students will create pieces in both permanent and transitory mediums supported by drawings, proposals and documentation. Concurrent with each assignment will be experiences that involve practical and technical communication, budgets, community and/or political challenges that extend beyond the studio. Field trips, visiting artists, architects and city planners augment class presentations.

One of the most exciting ways for designers and fine artists to come together is in the creation of spaces that that resonate with shared vision and energy. Students will develop detailed proposals in concert with the redesigning and renovation of the Student Union and MIAD’s attendant exterior spaces that will involve a real amalgamation of skill sets and perspective: sculpture, interior architecture + design, environmental graphics, furniture, lighting design, landscape, painting (mural and otherwise). Students will learn to work in teams that maximize well-considered diverse approaches to propose a unique, dynamic new environment.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): determined by specific course (senior-level sculpture standing)


FA456: Sculpture Thesis
This yearlong engagement focuses on the refinement of personal direction and the creation of a cohesive body of work culminating in a thesis exhibition. The resources of the sculpture department are wholly open for use as each person hones chosen skills and vision. Always studio work is primary, but professional practices specific to sculpture will round out those presented concurrently in senior seminar. Because we shape and are shaped by the context of time, culture and experience, the course will examine contemporary sculpture issues through field trips, visiting artists, readings, films, lectures, discussions and exercises.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): 12 credits 300-level sculpture


FA457: Sculpture Thesis
This yearlong engagement focuses on the refinement of personal direction and the creation of a cohesive body of work culminating in a thesis exhibition. The resources of the sculpture department are wholly open for use as each person hones chosen skills and vision. Always studio work is primary, but professional practices specific to sculpture will round out those presented concurrently in senior seminar. Because we shape and are shaped by the context of time, culture and experience, the course will examine contemporary sculpture issues through field trips, visiting artists, readings, films, lectures, discussions and exercises.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FA456


FA458: Topics in Expanded Field
Engaging a challenge and making it ones own is a refined dimension of being an artist. In the upper level of Topics in the Expanded Field, students will continue the exploration of a shared theme or issue but will be further pressed to meaningfully connect their inquiry with the general direction of their personal work through a final presentation.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): determined by specific course (senior-level sculpture standing)


FA490: Senior Fine Arts Seminar
The Senior Fine Arts Seminar is a forum for addressing and engaging post MIAD possibilities and issues including graduate school, community opportunities, business concerns, and other matters important to Fine Arts students who are about to graduate. It is also a forum for students to discuss and determine Senior Show preparations. Application of learned principles and skills via hands-on experiences allow students to take the first steps toward a professional practice as a fine artist upon graduation. Field trips, guest speakers, and visiting artists will impart significant perspectives on the art world beyond the classroom.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): Senior Standing


FA491: Senior Fine Arts Seminar
The Senior Fine Arts Seminar is a forum for addressing and engaging post MIAD possibilities and issues including graduate school, community opportunities, business concerns, and other matters important to Fine Arts students who are about to graduate. It is also a forum for students to discuss and determine Senior Show preparations. Application of learned principles and skills via hands-on experiences allow students to take the first steps toward a professional practice as a fine artist upon graduation. Field trips, guest speakers, and visiting artists will impart significant perspectives on the art world beyond the classroom.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): FA490



Download the 2013-14 Program of Study Catalog, with every Major and all course descriptions.

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