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Degree Courses - Drawing

FA200: Drawing I
Drawing I challenges the student with various complicated compositional problems. Technical proficiency and diversity are enriched through the use of familiar drawing media as well as aggressive experimentation with new media and manners of working. Additionally, the drawing experience is broadened by confronting a wide variety of drawing subjects.

Drawing I expands on the skills, knowledge and sensitivity gained during the Foundations year. Reinvestigation of familiar but complex concepts and technical issues will be undertaken with the intensity required to build on and expand the drawing repertoire rather merely repeating that which is already known. This course is approached with the belief that drawing should not imitate or replicate the world graphically but rather question, investigate, interpret and translate. Because of this, formal, technical and analytical concerns will be enriched by an emphasis on personal aesthetic ponderings and investigations. These higher-level concerns will nourish the student’s growing awareness of the multi-faceted and expressive nature of drawing.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F113/F115


FA201: Drawing II
Drawing II presents open-ended involvements which require students to determine their own artistic reactions, concerns and pursuits. In addition, anatomy of the head and neck is studied as an integral component to the expressive and inventive aspects of the portrait and the self-portrait.

Drawing is a multi-faceted and complex language. While elements of drawing may be isolated from the interconnected wholeness of the process for the sake of study, this isolation should always be made with the understanding that the act of drawing demands an approach in which all elements of the process are interrelated and not clearly procedural. The act of drawing should never be studied as a formula of fragmented procedural steps or isolated events (line, value, texture, mark-making, etc.) that accumulate in a predictable order.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FA200


FA210: Figure Drawing I
Figure Drawing I stresses correct perception and understanding of the human form through the study of human skeletal anatomy. Anatomical concerns are complemented by experimentation with new media and compositional issues.

Drawing is a multi-faceted and complex language. While elements of drawing may be isolated from the interconnected wholeness of the process for the sake of study, this isolation should always be made with the understanding that the act of drawing demands an approach in which all elements of the process are interrelated and not clearly procedural. The act of drawing should never be studied as a formula of fragmented procedural steps or isolated events (line, value, texture, mark-making, etc.) that accumulate in a predictable order.

Figure Drawing 1I proceeds from the Foundations figurative experience with heightened expectations concerning skill, perception, visual understanding, personal maturity and artistic purpose. The students are taken through drawing exercises that introduce them to higher level and more complex issues concerning skeletal anatomy, compositional structure and the manipulation of drawing media in response to the live model. The students will also become refocused on gesture, proportion, and the challenge of creating the illusion of 3-dimensional form and space on a 2-dimensional surface. During the course of the semester, not only will the students’ drawing skills improve but the rich potential held within the figurative subject will continue to reveal itself and inspire deeper investigation in Figure Drawing II.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F113/F115


FA211: Figure Drawing II
In Figure Drawing II students begin to explore the expressive potential of the human form through complicated compositional manipulations and media applications.

Figure Drawing II continues to build the foundation of drawing as well as deepen the students’ experience with and sensitivity to the human form as a source of study and inspiration. The students will explore the potential of the figure through exercises that center on the intuitive response, compositional problem solving, meaningful distortion and artistic intention. Media experimentation weaves through all of the exercises and use of realistic and expressive color is emphasized. The developing language of drawing will be the vehicle used to explore human structural complexities and meanings so that each student comes to understand their purpose and passion when working with the figure as a theme, subject of inquiry or point of departure.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FA210


FA300: Drawing III
In Drawing III students search, invent, embrace and develop individual concerns within traditional concepts. They work within broad parameters which promote and motivate drawing as a means to explore ideas rather than necessarily to arrive at a conclusive visual statement or goal.

Drawing III expands upon the technical, analytical, expressive and aesthetic aspects of drawing gained by the students in previous drawing courses. This course is designed so that the students will gain proficiency with a variety of media within a series of assignments that promote an awareness of drawing as a rich and multi-faceted means of describing and expressing visually. In addition, the course promotes each student’s journey toward individual and self-determined aesthetic concerns and imagery. The assignments promote exploration through a series of drawings. Each assignment allows for a wide range of interpretations and it is this range that demands that each student think, define, determine and execute in a way that presents not only high quality drawings but also personal investigation and definition.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FA201


FA301: Drawing IV
Building on the experiences of Drawing III, students immerse themselves in nurturing their own emerging artistic personalities and visual voices in Drawing IV.

Using what was gained in Drawing III concerning artistic identity and the responsibilities of personal investigation, the students move toward greater artistic autonomy. Their visual pursuits are formed within very broad assignment parameters and are expected to display maturity, depth and rigor. It is also expected that the students be grounded in a solid and well developed work ethic. Short-term exercises, discussions and formal critiques punctuate the semester.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FA300


FA310: Figure Drawing III
Figure Drawing III provides a thorough investigation of soft tissue human anatomy. The goal is to gain insight and awareness about the complexities of the human machine in order to facilitate sensitive and knowledgeable drawing.

The first semester of this junior level figure drawing course is primarily focused on human anatomy. The emphasis is on issues that deal directly with the needs of the visual artist. Lectures will be given weekly centering on the specifics and complexities of musculature and how the soft tissues integrate with the skeletal structures. All elements of human anatomy that have direct impact on the surface characteristics of the human form will be explored in depth.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FA211


FA311: Figure Drawing IV
Figure Drawing IV progresses from the anatomical focus to include the exploration of intuitive and responsive means and applications.

The second semester of the Junior level figure drawing course will examine me that the issues that pertain to intuition and how our intuition guides, if permitted, us to resolve in the act of drawing unlike the first semester that dealt with human anatomy the second semester will deal with the student's awareness of their psychological makeup and how that affects their concentration, stamina and balance between the conscience the conscious decision-making process and their subconscious motivations/responses parentheses intuition). The human figure will be the vehicle for this exploration.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FA310


FA400: Drawing Thesis
In Drawing Thesis, in conjunction with on-going independent work, each student mounts a retrospective exhibition of work done from early childhood to the present. This exhibition begins a comprehensive examination of self as an artist.

This year marks the 4th and final year of the students' educational experience at MIAD. It is a transitional year from student artist to studio artist. The primary expectations during this semester are greater awareness of the artist-self, commitment to the pursuit of depth and richness within one’s artistic questioning, definition of one’s artistic beliefs and goals and continued development and expansion of one’s visual work. The students will determine the direction of the year’s work rather than being guided by assignments. It is their opportunity to immerse themselves in their own developing philosophies, ideas and concerns and to explore and bring them to fruition in a comprehensive and cohesive body of work.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FA301


FA401: Drawing Thesis
Drawing Thesis uses what was learned in Drawing V as the foundation for the execution of work culminating in the thesis exhibition. This exhibition brings visual form to each student's unique artistic identity and celebrates it.

The primary expectations over the course of this semester are self-awareness and self-direction. The students will be responsible for defining their own artist issues and ideas and for bringing those to fruition in their visual work. The students will be required to examine their identity as visual artist and from that examination determine short-term artistic goals. An extensive written dissertation and a complete body of visual work is required and will be mounted as part of the senior thesis exhibitions presented at the conclusion of the semester. Group and individual critiques will take place throughout the semester.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FA400


FA410: Figure Drawing V
Figure Drawing V emphasizes the students’ responsibility in using the human form as a vehicle to explore and display personal vision.

This course, while still presenting skill-centered challenges, moves the students into visual investigations that explore and build figurative work and a figurative aesthetic which is personally derived and driven. A significant challenge will be to break through the predictable procedures and pursuits of a figure drawing class in order to find meaning within the figurative theme that has more personal significance and depth than the academic study.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FA311


FA411: Figure Drawing VI
Figure Drawing VI aims at drawings of maturity and sophistication as students move toward independence from art institute and assignment objectives. Students work closely with each other and the instructor to ensure a solid transition from student artist to professional artist.

Figure drawing VI builds upon ideas developed in Figure Drawing V and expands beyond in an effort to further clarify reasons for which a figure is used as a subject. The students will be strongly encouraged to question their own way of working, as well as that of others. A continued focus on personal expression and honesty in approaching the creative process will lead to visually compelling and honesty in sophisticated images. Nothing can substitute for a genuine expression, free from the pressures of fads or misplaced ambitions. Drawing from imagination complemented by the use of visual references of a student's choice will be the suggested working method. Drawing from the model will be the preferred way of obtaining visual references. Other references providing inspiration may include readings of all kinds, dreams, personal reflections, political convictions, one's cultural and /or ethnic background. A cross-over with Drawing VI will be sought when relevant.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): FA410


FA490: Senior Fine Arts Seminar
The Senior Fine Arts Seminar is a forum for addressing and engaging post MIAD possibilities and issues including graduate school, community opportunities, business concerns, and other matters important to Fine Arts students who are about to graduate. It is also a forum for students to discuss and determine Senior Show preparations. Application of learned principles and skills via hands-on experiences allow students to take the first steps toward a professional practice as a fine artist upon graduation. Field trips, guest speakers, and visiting artists will impart significant perspectives on the art world beyond the classroom.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): Senior Standing


FA491: Senior Fine Arts Seminar
The Senior Fine Arts Seminar is a forum for addressing and engaging post MIAD possibilities and issues including graduate school, community opportunities, business concerns, and other matters important to Fine Arts students who are about to graduate. It is also a forum for students to discuss and determine Senior Show preparations. Application of learned principles and skills via hands-on experiences allow students to take the first steps toward a professional practice as a fine artist upon graduation. Field trips, guest speakers, and visiting artists will impart significant perspectives on the art world beyond the classroom.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): FA490



Download the 2013-14 Program of Study Catalog, with every Major and all course descriptions.

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