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Communication Design: Success


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JAN. 1, 2014
FAFSA Process begins for Fall 2014 at fafsa.ed.gov
Remember to use MIAD's FAFSA Code:
014203

MAY 1,2014
Tuition Deposit Deadline / Housing Contract & Deposit Priority Date for Fall 2014

The career paths for Communication Designers are diverse and unique.  Explore the myriad of directions available to MIAD graduates in CD.

          (click on any topic to expand)

Common Job Titles

  • Graphic Designer
  • Art Director
  • Advertising Designer
  • Creative Director
  • Package Designer
  • Web Designer
  • Animator
  • Film Artist
  • Game Designer
  • Multimedia Artist
  • Storyboard Illustrator

Types of Projects and Work

  • Advertisements
  • Brochures
  • Business cards
  • Clothing graphics
  • Greeting cards
  • Letterhead
  • Logos
  • Outdoor advertising
  • Packaging
  • Posters
  • Signage
  • Typography
  • Animation
  • CD-ROMs
  • Games
  • Multimedia
  • Special effects
  • Storyboards
  • Television commercials
  • Videos
  • Web sites

Types of Businesses Hiring

  • Advertising agencies
  • Apparel design
  • Audio/visual services
  • Corporations
  • Graphic design firms/studios
  • Manufacturers
  • Marketing firms
  • Package design firms
  • Audio/visual service
  • Design firm
  • Digital effects
  • Film
  • Gaming
  • Internet
  • Television
  • Software
  • Special effects
  • Video production

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Examples of Businesses that MIAD graduates are employed at or own

Boelter + Lincoln
advertising agency; marketing

BVK/McDonald
advertising agency

Celtic Advertising
advertising agency

Core Creative, Inc.
advertising, marketing, public relations

Cramer-Krasselt Company
advertising agency

Estee Lauder; New York City
manufacturer, cosmetic

 

Fermi Accelerator Laboratory; Batavia, Illinois
government, high energy physics laboratory

H2D Inc.
design studio, graphic

Hanson Dodge Creative
graphic design firm

Harley-Davidson Motor Company
manufacturer, motorcycles

Hoffman York
advertising agency

Holoubek Inc.
apparel design and printing / silk screening

Huffy Sports
manufacturer, sporting goods

Integre' Advertising By Design
advertising

Jacobson Rost
advertising agency

Johnson Wax Professional
manufacturer

Kimberly Clark Corporation
manufacturer; consumer paper products

Kohl's Corporation
corporation, retail

Kohnke Hanneken Advertising, Inc.
advertising agency

Laughlin/Constable Inc.
advertising & public relations agency

Leo Burnett; Chicago
broadcast television, advertising

Marshall & Ilsley Corporation
financial institution, bank

Metavante Corporation
financial data processing and software

Nike Inc.; Beaverton, Oregon
manufacturer; athletic apparel

Nonbox/Eisner
advertising agency

Northwestern Mutual Life
insurance corporation

Pleasant Company
manufacturer; toys, doll specialty

Potawatomi Bingo Casino
casino, entertainment

Purple Onion
audio/visual services, visual effects

Rockwell Automation
electronic automation solutions and products

Sargento Foods, Inc.
food manufacturer and marketer

The Mark Travel Corporation
tour operator of travel

The West Bend Company
manufacturing; small electric appliances

Sony Interactive Studios; Boulder, Colorado
Interactive / video game design

Strive Media Institute
nonprofit organization, teaching youth

Triad Communications
marketing communications firm

Versant
advertising agency

Young & Rubicam; Chicago
advertising agency

Zentropy; New York City
corporation; equity benefits

Zizzo Group Advertising
advertising agency; print and broadcast

ALUMNI SUCCESS: Barb Paulini Nelson

Barb Paulini Nelson
From Print to Products: How One Designer Communicates.

  • attended Nicolet High School, Glendale, WI
  • graduated 1988, BFA Graphic Design (now Communication Design)
  • served as an Art Director for 12 years before opening her own business

 

Barb Paulini Nelson

"An internship at a local ad agency proved extremely beneficial; not only was I able to gain valuable experience, I was able to network and engage socially with others in my field."

From billboards to catalogues to websites and packaging, thousands of messages are directed at us each day. We are surrounded by communication, and no one knows it better then Barb Paulini Nelson. Serving as an Art Director for over a decade, Paulini Nelson was a fountain for new ideas, creating design work for a large number of clients and various specifications, overseeing a team of designers, and building strong relationships with businesses. Later, she took the knowledge she had gained and opened her own design business. Paulini Nelson says "Interdisciplinary Design" best describes the work her firm is doing which includes crafting interiors, identities, and impressions, and soon, product design.

Q. What was the most valuable thing that you learned at MIAD, and how has your MIAD education affected where you are today?

A. The awareness and discovery of purpose, the celebration of different perspectives, and the acceptance of the gift that is inherent in each of us--I believe are the guides that have forged my path as a designer. And I know, for certain, that my education at MIAD celebrated and encouraged the investigation of these ideas.

Studio PauliniQ. What's the one thing you would tell a high school student who is considering attending MIAD now that you've experienced life after graduation?

A. One of the beneficial things about MIAD is the location. Milwaukee is a non-intimidating city environment. It's easily accessible, and relatively inexpensive during those first few years away from home.

Trillium LogoQ. Are there any parts of your résumé or career experience that you'd like to share?

A. In my career I have accomplished most of what I dreamed of as a student -- having been published in national design periodicals, journals, and award publications; yet, my greatest successes are the client relationships I've been a part of, and the growth of their businesses due to our shared vision, our working together to determine and execute the best design plans to help them meet their goals.

My view of myself as a designer shifted drastically eight years ago when, after serving agencies as an Art Director for twelve years, I opened my own business. "Interdisciplinary design" are the words that best capture the scope of my firm's work. I now craft interiors, identities, and impressions, incorporating my aesthetic vision into all aspects of a business, life, or space. Soon, I hope to continue this growth by branching out further into product design.

Kohler showroom brochure designQ. Can you define how you've seen your major change since leaving school?

A. The industry has changed significantly over the years -- however, one steadfast rule from my educational experience continues to resound -- even in our current technologically sophisticated society; idea and execution are everything, and when that can take center stage is when you'll shine through as a designer.

 

various identity work

 

 

kohler showroom brochure design

 

 

kohler showroom brochure designs

 

ALUMNI SUCCESS: Max Estes

Max Estes
A Passion for Creating that's "no joke."

  • attended Badger High School, Lake Geneva, WI
  • graduated 1999, BFA Communication Design
  • currently attending graduate school at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • writes and illustrates children's books + graphic novels

 

Max Estes

 

"Don't be afraid to run full force toward what you want to do most with your art."

Writer. Illustrator. Teacher.

Max Estes does it all. Growing up, Estes was surrounded by art and creativity (Max's mom wrote choose-your-own-adventure books that were mostly medieval fantasy novels, and Max's stepdad created sci-fi board games like "Snit's Revenge" and "The Awful Green Things From Outer Space"). Now, on his own creative journey, Estes just published his first graphic novel, with the second following this Spring. He works in his studio as much as possible conceptualizing, writing, and illustrating graphic novels, children's books, and comics. Estes is currently pursuing a Master of Fine Arts degree so that he can teach illustration and sequential art courses in the future.

Cover for Hello Again, Estes' first graphic novelQ. What did you think you wanted to be when you grew up?

A. I didn't really think about it much. I just knew I'd go to art school.

Q. What is your first memorable experience with art and design?

A. I was an avid skateboarder when I was young. The art and designs that graced the bottom half of skateboards had a huge effect on me as a young, aspiring artist. Those graphics were like a window into some fascinating subculture, and led me to start putting ideas down on paper. Many years later, I would go on to design skateboard graphics, an opportunity that was near the top of my list of "career goals" to meet.

Q. What was the most valuable thing you learned at MIAD?

A. You don't stop learning when you leave the campus. It's not just classrooms and assignments; your college experience spans far beyond the campus walls. You take your lessons with you onto the streets, into your life.

Coffee and Donuts, Estes' second graphic novelQ. What's the one thing you would tell a high school student who is considering attending MIAD now that you've experienced life after graduation?

A. Don't be afraid to run full force toward what you want to do most with your art. You can make a living doing most anything with enough passion put forth.

Q. Please define how you saw your major while you were in school, and how that definition has changed over the years.

A. I graduated with a Bachelors in Communication Design, but upon graduation, I found that I was more interested in design theory as opposed to the graphic design industry (i.e. a 9 to 5 design job). I learned to take what I wanted from my background in graphic design and apply it to my illustration/cartooning career.

Q. Are there any notable parts of your résumé that you'd like to share?

A. My first graphic novel, Hello, Again is available in stores nationwide and online. My second book, Coffee & Donuts will be in stores in Spring, 2006. Don't be scared to add variety to your résumé; be adventurous with your career and try new things.

 

Estes comic

ALUMNI SUCCESS: Justin Thomas Kay

Justin Thomas Kay
MKE to NYC.

  • attended New Berlin West High School, New Berlin, WI
  • graduated 2004, BFA Communication Design
  • currently a graphic designer + typographer for Complex magazine in New York

 

Justin Thomas Kay

 

"MIAD kept me focused and disciplined, and gave me the building blocks to help push me to where I am today."

Passion could be Justin Kay's middle name. Initially starting out as an Illustration major at MIAD, Kay later decided to change his major to Communication Design. That change proved to be just the one he needed to pave a successful path after graduation that took him from Milwaukee to Brooklyn. With a day job as a graphic designer and typographer at a high profile NY magazine, and free lance and independent design work beyond his 9 to 5, Kay proclaims, "I am my work...my work must be my life passion."

Q. What did you think you wanted to be when you grew up?

A. Honestly? I had no clue. I guess my clearest vision was a comic book illustrator -- I had piles and piles of notebooks scrawled with characters and beasts, and fake role playing games that I would make up with full story lines so my stepbrother could play them. I think some even involved twenty-sided die.

Q. What is your first memorable experience with art and design?

A. My grandmother is an amazing artist, as was my father. Aside from being wonderful, beautiful people, they are my largest inspiration. My grandmother has been a creative person her whole life in many ways -- her focus has shifted now to creating an impressively extensive family tree including all the legal documents she can find. It fills up almost two large bookcases. I get my compulsive drive to work on my own projects from her.

OneOneNine, a self-published zine

Q. How did your MIAD education affect where you are today?

A. My decision to go to art school was extremely personally motivated, especially once I switched the illustration major to communication design. MIAD kept me focused and disciplined, and gave me the building blocks to help push me to where I am today. I am 100 percent happy with my decision. No regrets.

Q. What was the most valuable thing you learned at MIAD?

A. I learned the importance of typography and structuring information. Oh, and how to appreciate hummus and pita which I had for the first time as a MIAD freshman. What can I say -- I was a sheltered young man from the suburbs.

Complex magazine cover

Q. What would you tell a high school student who is considering attending MIAD now that you have experienced life after graduation?

A. The "status" of schools is not important. What is important is the overall environment and lifestyle a college can provide for you. MIAD gave me access to a great group of people to work with and an amazing work environment. Go for it.

Q. What are your goals for the future, in art and design and in life?

A. My goals are to continue to do what I love and be around loved ones. I will never settle for just "work." I am my work, and thus my work must be my life passion or I will never be satisfied with what I am doing. Short term, I'll be marrying my fiance, Karli Stein, and continuing to work. Long term, my goal is to open a book store that I can also work out of and freelance for a living.

Q. Are there any specific parts of your résumé that you'd like to share?

A. By day, I'm a graphic designer for Complex magazine which is a huge accomplishment to me -- I've been reading it for about three years, so I'm very happy to be here. In my free time, I work non-stop on independent and freelance projects.

Complex magazine page spreadQ. Please define how you saw your major while you were in school, and how that definition has changed over the years.

A. When I was in school, I saw it as a tool to help me gear up for my life [after school], not as an excuse to not have a "real" job and just mess around. My perception hasn't changed, and actually, with how lucky I have been to land such an amazing job, it just reinforced my opinion on my education.

 

Fantastic Form logo

 

ALUMNI SUCCESS: Jason Herkert

Jason Herkert
Design Dreams

  • graduated 1995, BFA Communication Design
  • currently Senior Graphic Designer at Nike in Oregon www.nikegolf.com

Jason Herkert"MIAD taught me how to think for myself and not rely on others to make things happen."

"I thought growing up I was going to be the next Michael Jordan, or maybe it was Pele; no, it was definitely Robin Yount," says Herkert. While early dreams of sports legend may have escaped him, Jason Herkert has found another way to live the dream. Currently, he's a senior graphic designer at Nike in Beaverton, Oregon, working on the Nike Golf image design group. "I moved to Portland to work at Nike and be closer to the mountains. I have the best of both worlds. Mount Hood is only one hour east and the Pacific coast is an hour west."

 

nikegolf advertisements

As a Communication Design graduate, "MIAD taught me to think for myself and not rely on others to make things happen. I don't necessarily believe in luck when it comes to success. Luck happens when you have a vision and are determined to make it a reality."

And when asked about his future plans, Herkert said, "Ideally, I'd like to open up a surf shop in Hawaii or take photographs for a living. I try not to limit my possibilities. Right now, I'm happy with what I'm doing."

ALUMNI SUCCESS: Sabine Beaupre

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Sabine Beaupre
Visual Communication:
Graphic Design + Publication.

  • attended Wellesley High School, Wellesley, MA
  • graduated 1988, BFA Graphic Design
  • currently works as a freelance designer, specializing in publishing

Sabine Beaupre

Sabine (Huschke) Beaupre has taken her Graphic Design degree from MIAD and transformed it into a career which focuses on proving information through various publications. At MIAD, "I learned that creativity and discipline go hand in hand. As a successful designer, you can't have one without the other."

Beaupre's art teacher proved to be a huge influence on her decision to attend an art school.

"Mrs. Stoddard was amazing in guiding me to pursue my dream of going to an art college. After my education at MIAD, I felt prepared and confident to make my way into the design world."

What's next for Beaupre? "As a freelance designer specializing in publishing, I plan to continue growing my own business and take on new challenges."

 

 

 

examples of Beaupe's published designs, which may include magazines, periodicals, pamphlets, brochures and advertisements.

 

ALUMNI SUCCESS: Joe Hausch

Joe Hausch
Visual Voice: From the Milwaukee Bucks to Brett Favre

  • attended Pius XI High School, Milwaukee, WI
  • graduated 1984, BFA Communication Design
  • owns Hausch Design Agency, LLC
    www.hauschdesign.com

"I could not have done what I have accomplished over the years if it wasn't for the relationships I developed during my time at MIAD."

Q. What did you want to be when you grew up?

Joe HauschA. My parents and family really encouraged me since I was very young. I won a number of art contests starting when I was about 9, and then finally won a silver palette award from the Milwaukee Journal in 1978. I thought I had to do something with my art skills.

Q. What was your first memorable experience with art and design?

A. I won $100 (in 1972 or 1973 -- I was ten or eleven, I think) for winning a contest to "draw your favorite Milwaukee Buck." I drew Junior Bridgeman.

Q. How did your MIAD education affect where you are today?

A. I had two job lined up, had one a national art director's award, and was student teaching typography by the time I was a senior at MIAD in 1983. I could not have done what I have accomplished over the years if it wasn't for the relationships I developed during my time at MIAD. Becky and Fran Balistreri were instrumental in my career (as well as Mark Koerner, Steve Quinn, and Rick Thrun) and I still have great relationships with most of my former instructors even though we are sometimes competing for similar work.

 

marketing pieces and apparel for the Brett Favre

 

Q. What was the most valuable thing you learned at MIAD?

A. What "professionals" are actually doing in their field.

Q.What's the one thing you would tell a high school student who is considering attending MIAD now that you've experienced life after graduation?

A. Pick a mentor and do anything you can to hang around with that person in and out of school.

logo designs for Radio Paradise.

 

Q. What are your goals for the future, in art/design and in life?

A. I am living a lot of them right now and need to "retool" my career in the next four years. I have been a partner in a larger firm, I've worked with large companies and famous people including Brett Favre. I've started and been a partner in a number of different businesses. I waited a long time to get married and have children. Now, I have two kids and a new business and I get to see everybody grow up -- including my design interns.

graphic design work for Ralph Marlin. and package design for leWine Game.
Q. What are some of your hobbies/interests?

A. Music: listening to, collecting, seeing and being in bands (I was in the obscure Rock Band "Couch Flambeau" from 1986-1994 with another MIAD alum, Jay Tiller). Other hobbies? Traveling, golf, bowling (got a 300 this year and I'm ready to retire from that game), painting, drawing, photography, and doing any and all of the above with my children. (re)Designing everything in the world as I look around.

Q. Are there any specific parts of your resume that you'd like to share?

A. I've done a lot of packaging and display design, and consulting for Bemis Toilet Seats which are on display at Home Depot. That's not a bunch of crap either!

I've done sports marketing, and came up with the idea for the Brett Favre "Favrecanduit!" shirts/product line in 1992 after he won his first game. I signed the first marketing contract with him which was a three-year deal in '92. Since then, I've worked with other players such as Santana Dotson, and former SuperBowl quarterback Brad Johnson.

I have been an artist invited to participate in the "Open Canvas" which raises funds for MIAD and the Eisner Museum of Advertising & Design. I have supported many other not-for-profit organizations, including serving on the board and as Board Chair for "ARTReach Milwaukee." Recently, I was involved on the board of IndependenceFirst: A Resource for People with Disabilities, for seven years, and am now on retainer with them as a Brand/Marketing/Design Consultant.

ALUMNI SUCCESS: Rhiannon Sterling

Rhiannon Sterling
Real-life Design.

  • attended James Madison Memorial High School, Madison, WI
  • graduated 2003 BFA Communication Design
  • currently attending Carnegie Mellon University for a Master's degree in Interaction Design

Rhiannon Sterling

 

"MIAD laid the foundation for my design career. I learned design fundamentals through the guidance of the school's exceptional and respected design faculty."

Q. What did you want to be when you grew up?

A. As a child I dreamed of becoming an astronaut like Sally Ride. While I didn't actually end up becoming an astronaut, I certainly make it to outer space every once in a while.

Q. What was your first memorable experience with art and design?

A. When I was very young, I made a Father's Day card titled, "Top Ten Reasons I'm Glad You're My Dad." It was a multi-paged array of magazine cutouts and bubble letters. I consider it one of my best works, based entirely on the impact it had on the targeted audience.

Q. How did your MIAD education affect where you are today?

A. MIAD laid the foundation for my design career. I learned design fundamentals through the guidance of the school's exceptional and respected design faculty. The intimacy of the MIAD community serves as a catalyst to my career development. I received the hands-on attention that large schools can't provide and I was exposed to international perspectives through the exchange programs MIAD maintains with schools worldwide. I spent a semester in Milan, which was invaluable in my development as a design practitioner.

 

Frut, an MP3 player for mothers.

 

Q. What was the most valuable thing you learned at MIAD?

A. I learned to use the resources that you have around you. Ask questions, experiment, test and challenge anything.

Q. If you had to sum up your job in a single sentence, what would it be?

A. I am currently working towards a Master's degree in Interaction Design at Carnegie Mellon University, and after I graduate I will be designing mobile device interfaces at Motorola in Chicago.

 

goPlay, activity-based social networking concept

 

 

goPlay concept team, Sterling [center]

 

Q. What are your goals for the future, in art/design and in life?

A. Over the past semester, my thesis work has focused on how mobile phones are used to support religious and spiritual practices. Although this particular union may seem strange, mobile devices are taking on new roles in people's lives. I'm one of a small group of designers trying to define this nascent space in the market.

Q. Please define how you saw your major while in school, and how that definition has changed over the years.

A. My background is in Communication Design, but I've learned that my knowledge and experience are applicable to solving more than just publication or artifact problems. Now more than ever, design governs how we live and interact with one another. It can be used to mold organizations or provide better customer experiences. Top-tier companies have only recently discovered the cusp of what is possible with good design. I think now is an exciting time for design practitioners because our contributions are becoming more and more relevant.

ALUMNI SUCCESS: David Nelson

David Nelson
Visual Experiences

  • attended Madison West High School, Madison, WI
  • graduated 2002 BFA Communication Design
  • currently a Senior Design Technologist @ Method
  • view work samples at www.theNthroot.com

"MIAD was one of the best experiences I ever had."

Q. As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?

A. I always knew I wanted to do something with art. I started doing design work in high school and fell in love with it from the get-go. MIAD was the obvious next step to get me where I wanted to be.

David NelsonQ. What was your first memorable experience with art or design?

A. I won an advertising competition when I was 9 or so when a teacher persuaded me to enter. The contest was to draw something to help convince kids that wearing a bike helmet was cool. Seeing my drawing on all the buses in town was the coolest thing that had ever happened to me.

Q. How did your MIAD education affect where you are today?

A. Honestly, MIAD was one of the best experiences I ever had. It really gave me a constructive place to focus my energy and I got the chance to meet some of the most talented people I know.

Q. What was the most valuable thing you learned at MIAD?

A. Problem-solving; it's the key to being a great designer.

Q. If you had to sum up your job in a single sentence, what would it be?

interactive media for cadillac escaladeA. I design the user experiences that define the future of ideas and communications, including designing and developing strategy directions and advanced interactive media for clients such as Autodesk, Microsoft, HP and Yahoo!

Q. Define how you saw your major while in school and how that definition has changed over the years.

A. Technology aside, design is design. It's always been about solving problems and communicating ideas. Print, web, environmental design, they're all, in essence, the same conceptually. You just need to focus on the work that interests you.

interactive media for HP

ALUMNI SUCCESS: Michael DelGaudio

Michael DelGaudio
Technology, made tangible.

  • grew up in Burlington, VT
  • graduated 2001 BFA Communication Design
  • 2007 Master of Professional Studies, Interactive Telecommunications, New York University
  • currently an interactive technology consultant
  • http://michaeldelgaudio.com

"...in the second grade, I won first prize in the science fair for building a really kick-ass volcano."

Michael DelGaudioMichael DelGaudio is motivated to learn about how people exist with, adapt to, and reinvent technology. By creating work which engages users aesthetically and conceptually, his aim is to rethink people's everyday experiences with technologically inspired products. As a post-medium designer, Michael's work ranges from mobile software to highly conceptual interactive installations.

Recently, he has taken an interest in tangible information visualization systems, ubiquitous technologies, and ambient informatics. He has presented work at BAP Labs, Conflux (New York's annual contemporary psycho-geography conference) and has spoken at Google and Yahoo! Research. Additionally, Michael won first prize in the Fishkill Elementary second grade science fair for building a 'really kick-ass' volcano.

 

Alphabet Machine, 2006

 

Alphabet Machine, 2006 wooden type blocks, solenoids, custom circuitry

Alphabet Machine is a kinetic sculpture that allows viewers to see and hear the rhythm and pentameter of text. Digital text is the primary communication vehicle of the 21st century. Whether it comes in the form of email or hypertext, digital information has no physical presence. This is an obvious difference from printed communication that not so long ago was our primary communication vehicle. The Alphabet Machine attempts to recover this loss of physicality. The text orchestrated through the device, Gutenberg's bible, remind us of the loss of physicality in communication in the digital era.

 

Mutherboard, 2007

 

MutherBoard, 2007 lucite, custom electronics and software

MutherBoard examines how embedded computation can record and display information generated while snowboarding. Specifically, the system uses sensors to collect motion characteristics about how snowboarders are riding. Unique graphics on the board change color based on the ability level of the rider. The customized board graphics raise awareness of personal accomplishment and opens the door for dialog between riders.

 

World Oil Clock, 2006

 

World Oil Clock, 2006 java, information visualization

World Oil Clock is a series of line drawings generated using oil consumption data based on each country's daily consumption rate. In this example, the top ten consumers of oil are used to create the composition. The predatory nature of consuming at a higher rate becomes obvious as countries which consumer more oil dominate the screen and search out new areas in which they can consume.

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