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Degree Courses - Humanities & Sciences Courses

HU121: Human Thought and Action
Human Thought and Action introduces multiple ideas, disciplines, and forms of making meaning. It serves as an introduction to humanist inquiry, focusing on critical thinking, the analysis of ideas, formulating questions, and the interconnectedness of knowledge and the various disciplines.
The philosophical, historical, theological, psychological, and sociological narratives created by humans form the structure of our lives. Human Thought and Action investigates the human meaning-making impulse and the articulation of human ideas and experiences through various disciplines.

HU121 is an interdisciplinary inquiry into human thought, action and reaction. In this course, teachers and students will examine the way that humanist knowledge and processes have influenced humankind’s perception of self through millennia. As a prerequisite for the upper-level humanities courses, HU121 focuses on significant forms of knowledge and ontological questions. Students will be challenged to reflect upon and discuss definitions of group problem-solving activities, “community,” cultural literacy, and the importance of human action and witness to a culture.
Through study of specific texts, students will explore the way that humans have borne witness to their experiences and sought to find meaning in them in various ways. Students will explore different views on the human experience through familiar activities – close reading of primary and secondary texts, class discussions, inquiry journals and take-home essays and transactional writing, participation in public events in the MIAD community, field trips, and on-site research.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): WR111 or WR120


HU340/360 Topics in Cultural Studies
Topic in Cultural Studies offers students a range of topics in the interdisciplinary study of cultural phenomena in various societies. Courses may draw on or combine the methods and perspectives of an array of disciplines, including literary theory, media theory, film/video studies, cultural anthropology, history, philosophy, political economy, communication, sociology, social theory, psychology, museum studies, art history, and the history, philosophy or sociology of science. Experience in the topic is broadened through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments. As an advanced-level course, HU360 is designed with the understanding that the coursework will feature interpretation, analysis, and critical method rather than mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Each student will be expected to engage actively with course materials and methods and contribute regularly to class discussions and/or oral collaborative efforts—such as focus groups and panel discussions—that relate to course material.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): HU121 and WR200


HU380: Service Learning
Service Learning is an interdisciplinary course with a service-learning component and is designed as the synthesis of a student’s four-year humanities and social science experience. In HU380 students will study a topic in-depth (i.e., cities, families, borders, aging, food) and be presented with many opportunities for interdisciplinary investigation. Through intensive reading, writing, research and oral assignments, students will analyze an issue in order to evaluate how social groups function and work towards resolution. Topics will be dealt with through scholarly and community investigations that may include sociology, psychology, anthropology, economics, political science, and history.

In HU380 students will have the opportunity to examine a social issue in depth, from a variety of perspectives. The coursework will focus on the historical and philosophical background of a given topic, as well as helping students to learn how to assess a variety of approaches to social systems through an examination of the nature of service in the community.

In the study of the social sciences, we examine patterns in our personal lives, the communities we live in, and a larger global context in order to see how they are connected. Through the in-depth study of a particular topic (i.e., food, cities, family, rivers, borders, aging), students will be able to analyze an issue in order to evaluate how social groups understand and work towards resolution. HU380 includes a service- learning component that is connected to the topic being studied. This will take place in the larger community, and it will allow students to examine the information they are learning through thinking and acting in a multicultural context.

Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): HS121 and WR200 + Junior Standing


SC220: Patterns in Nature
The Introduction to NS is based upon first hand investigations and discoveries in the field of Natural Sciences. In this course students will deepen their understanding of the nature of the scientific method, its theoretical challenges, and pursue a series of empirical applications in the lab and in the field. This practical knowledge will be broadened through intensive reading, discussions, critiques, and oral assignments. This is an intensive, practical approach that uses the scientific method as a tool for investigation, problem solving and critical thinking. This course is challenging and demanding, but rewarding. Excellence in analytical and critical thinking skills are of utmost importance.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): none


SC320: Natural Science Elective
Topics in Natural Science

SC320 is an advanced-level course that examines one of the many fields of Natural Sciences. Topics in Natural Science will rotate on a semester basis.  Students will study the nature of scientific inquiry, the methods, theories, discoveries, technology, and language important to the specific field of science of their choosing. As part of the course, students will also conduct an independent inquiry utilizing the basis of scientific inquiry and research.

As an advanced course, SC320 builds upon skills and knowledge acquired in SC220. It is designed with the understanding that the coursework will focus on interpretation, analysis and critical method rather than on mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Students will examine a field of natural science through readings and lecture material from a variety of sources and from a range of scientific and critical opinion. The material and assignments will vary depending upon the field of natural sciences taught.

This course can be retaken with change in topic for a 6 credits maximum.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): SC220

 

SC321: Topics in Natural Sciences – Field Experiences

As an advanced course, SC321 builds upon skills and knowledge acquired in SC220. It is designed with the understanding that the coursework will focus on interpretation, analysis and critical method rather than on mere assimilation and recall of factual material. Students will first examine the field of natural science through readings and lecture material from a variety of sources and from a range of scientific and critical opinion.  Students will apply in the field the theoretical knowledge gained by a literature review, with direct inquiry and hands-on activities and investigations. This course relies heavily on field work, direct inquiry and self-directed independent research culminating with a peer-reviewed oral examination.  Note:  The field component of this course  i9 days, located at offsite from MIAD.  

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): SC220 or equivalent and permission of the instructors.

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