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Degree Courses - Interior Architecture + Design

DS220: IAD I: Residential
IA+D Design I: Residential Design is the first design studio in the six semester design studio sequence within the IA+D Area. This course addresses the most fundamental and therefore most significant building type: the home. And while at first pass, the course might appear to be only about residential design, the student will be asked to consider the proposition put forth by Gaston Bachelard, in his the Poetics of Space, that “all really inhabited space bears within it the essence of the notion of home.” Because our ability to inhabit the world can be looked upon as an extension of our capacity to inhabit the home, in considering Bachelard’s proposition this course thereby establishes a foundation for all subsequent design studios.

This course will introduce and endeavor to address a wide variety of subject areas that are germane to the study of architecture + interior design. We will begin by identifying a series of underlying assumption that serve as a point of departure for this and other sophomore level IA+D courses. These assumptions are:
1. that “design” in general, including for our purposes architecture, interior architecture, and interior design, are as fundamental to our world (perhaps even more so) as “art”;
2. that the process and products of design and art share much in common;
3. that understood properly, design is simply another name for “forethought” – that is, thinking ahead;
4. that all incoming students already possesses a lifetime’s worth of experience upon which to draw and build;
and
5. that the visual language of design often reveals its meaning to us directly and immediately.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F113/F115


DS221: IAD II; Work Space/Office Design
IA+D Design II: Work Space / Office Design is the second design studio in the six semester design studio sequence within the IA+D Area. This course will address a variety of different work settings and work environments at varying scales of focus and development. Whenever possible the students will undertake a small scale ‘real’ project, that is a project that has a potential to be built.

This course will introduce and endeavor to address a wide variety of subject areas that are germane to the study of architecture + interior design. We will begin by identifying a series of underlying assumption that serve as a point of departure for this and other sophomore level IA+D courses. These assumptions are:
1. that “design”, including architecture, interior architecture, and interior design, are as fundamental to
our world as “art”;
2. that the process and products of design and art share much in common;
3. that understood properly, design is simply another name for “forethought” – that is, thinking ahead;
4. that all incoming students already possesses a lifetime’s worth of experience upon which to draw and
build; and
5. that the visual language of design often reveals its meaning to us directly and immediately.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS220


DS222: IAD Drawing/CAD I: Drafting, Sketch-up & Auto CAD
IA+D Drawing I is an in‐depth exploration into two and three dimensional architectural representation. This course seeks to teach aspiring architectural designers how to create compelling imagery through the use of hand sketching, drafting, diagramming and digital modeling. This course will serve as a comprehensive introduction into the broad range of drawing types that have been traditionally employed by architectural designers.
Students will learn to represent the mind's eye through traditional orthographic drawings and hand drafting techniques. Throughout the semester, students will gain an understanding of the role both hand drafting and digital drawing plays in the profession of architecture and design. By the end of the semester, students will be proficient in concept development, traditional hand drafting, SketchUp's digital modeling capabilities, and in creating and giving a project presentation both tangibly and digitally.

IA+D Drawing I will give students a rich palette of representational possibilities, techniques, means and methods to facilitate meaningful architectural design and creative self-expression.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F113/F115


DS223: IAD Drawing/CAD II: Advanced Auto CAD & REVIT
This course is a follow-up to the Interior Architecture + Design Computer Drawing I course. Students will further develop their understanding and ability relative to the programs introduced in the earlier course and at the same time gain familiarity with additional programs.

The Computer Drawing II course will explore the use of the computer as a tool in producing a set of contract documents. Students will be asked to produce a built drawing of an existing building, and to assemble a set of contract documents of a design. We will build off of digital modeling techniques using SketchUp and introduce rendering and composite image-making using digital and analog media including Photoshop, Illustrator and Kerkythea among others.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS222


DS224: IAD Systems I: Elements of Design
IA+D Systems I: Elements of Design initiates the content driven systems sequence within the curriculum of the Interior Architecture + Design Program. The systems sequence is designed to introduce and deliver critical content to IA+D students - through application in the design studio sequence. In time, this content will help to give form to the designs that are conceived and developed by the students.

The course will serve as both an introduction to and a broad survey of the four interrelated and interconnected industries: architecture, interior design, furniture design, and building construction that combine to give form to the discipline of ‘interior architecture’. In this way this course will serve to acclimate the incoming student to the world of built form by introducing a range of issues that draw a direct between the user and the designed object. are fundamental to an understanding on the industry. In the process, the course will also serve to assign meaning and seek to give voice to each incoming student’s life experiences as these relate to the inhabitation of built form.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): F113/F115


DS225: IAD Systems II: Materials & Finishes
This course has two simultaneous and congruent goals:
1. To study the relationship of color and materials on the interior environment &
2. Learn how to investigate and procure physical materials and samples & keep them organized and
accessible as well as develop relationships in the field.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): DS224


DS226: IAD Theory/Practice: Human Factors
In DS226A IA+D Theory/Practice: Human Factors, the students will learn how to research for inspiration and conceptualization, sketch or draw to visualize ideas and forms, build models to further develop concepts, and ultimately fabricate the objects they have designed. Through lecture and demonstrations students will learn how to choose and utilize a variety of materials, processes, tools, and finishes to achieve this goal. Students will be required to participate in individual discussion with their instructor and in group discussion with their instructor and classmates about developing their ideas and concepts into a satisfactory design solution for the specific assignment that they are engaged in completing at that time. Students will also be expected to present their work to an audience of their peers and instructors as professional designers in training. In the Design Build component of our class we will explore model building materials, wood materials, hardware, processes, technique, millwork, structure and finishes.

The students in DS226A IA+D Theory/Practice: Human Factors, must learn how present their ideas through their drawings, models, and by presenting images of precedents, further clarified through group discussions with their instructor and classmates. The students will be expected to further their hands-on skills in the 3-D Lab and learn the basic tenets of constructing wooden objects over the spectrum of small, hand-held objects, such as a serving board, to residential construction techniques, such as Western Platform Framing and Post and Beam construction methods. This course is designed to increase the students’ knowledge and understanding of the properties and characteristics of the materials that they will be using to complete their hands-on assignments. Another skill that we want students to accomplish is how to cooperate in group settings in the work environment. Students that graduate from this class will have learned how to present their ideas and their work in a professional manner to an audience, who could be their peers or their clients, with an articulate and convincing speech.

This class is not only a design class, but most importantly this class is a testing ground of designs. The students in this class actually get to bring their designs to life by fabricating them. During critique, the students will compare and determine whether the final completed object has successfully fulfilled the design expectations.

In this class, we would like to identify students with a specific desire and ability to tailor their course of studies in the IA+D major, in the direction of becoming Designer/Builders of architectural objects, primarily custom-made furniture and high-end, wooden residential structures.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): F113/F115


DS227: IAD Theory/Practice: Design In-Depth
This course will afford students the opportunity to design and build a single small piece of furniture – either an end table or side table, a small coffee table, or a night stand - made exclusively or predominantly of wood (wood products and sheet goods such as plywood or particle board will be discouraged and/or greatly restricted). The piece of furniture you design should be “roughly” contained within a volume measuring 18” x 18” x 36”. Applied finishes to your piece may include modified varnish, acrylic urethane, various types of oil, or paint.

Please be clear that we are completely invested in this class, committed to the success of this class, and therefore invested in your work and committed to your success. Understand as well, that while we will offer demonstrations with regards to wood working tools, techniques, and finishes it is assumed that you and you alone are responsible for fabricating your piece of furniture.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS226


DS320: IAD III: Retail/Showroom Design
IAD III: Retail/Showroom Design will serve as an introduction to design within the scope of commercial-retail space and showroom planning. Students will study and learn from published materials and visits to local examples of the particular type of project that they will be called upon to design. The course is designed to build your knowledge of retail design through projects that embrace unique and different strategies for approaching design within a consumer-based business. To the extent possible, we will establish and work within a specified set of circumstances. You will be dealing with learning about real world conditions directly through discussions with your instructors as well as others who routinely confront such issues. The projects, themselves, may not all have the potential to be built but the location of the projects, the clients, or the clientele will all be as real as circumstances permit.

In recent years junior level IA+D students enrolled in this course have undertaken sponsored projects with external clients such as the Harley-Davidson Motor Company and Kohler Company. These relationships have been instrumental in our ability to place graduating students in design positions at these companies. This semester we are in the process of once again exploring relationships with both Harley-Davidson and Interior Systems Incorporated to undertake sponsored projects. Additional information regarding the specifics of these projects will be forthcoming.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS221


DS321: IAD IV: Collaborative Exhibit Design/Build
The Collaborative Design-Build Studio is a comprehensive interior design studio in which students are granted the opportunity to work on a community-based project with local design professionals under the guidance and direction of IA+D faculty. The students work alongside practicing designers through all phases of the design process, schematic to construction documents, and then a group of select students are offered internships during the summer to participate in bidding and construction observation. IA+D faculty take on the role of facilitators ensuring that effective communication takes place between the team of design professionals and the team of student designers, and also providing the students with readings and exercises to guide them through the design process. Further, the design-build framework creates an opportunity for the students to learn about basic construction methods and to review code compliance and ADA requirements with the professional team. This comprehensive, real-world scenario prepares the Junior IA+D student for the challenges of summer internships/employment and the interdisciplinary nature of professional practice.


DS322: IAD Drawing/CAD III: Advanced REVIT
This course serves as a follow-up to the earlier Interior Architecture + Design Computer Drawing courses. Students are asked to further develop their understanding and ability relative to the programs introduced in earlier courses and, at the same time, to develop proficiency in newly introduced software and modeling, rendering, and post-production techniques. Predominantly, this course seeks to provide students with the necessary skill set to work in a professional design firm in a digital manner.

This course will explore the use of the computer as a tool in producing high-quality presentation materials, including floor plans, elevations, 3D models, and Renderings. This course will focus on learning three dimensional drawing, by studying both traditional and digital illustration techniques, using computer software, hand drawings, and other tools. Students will become proficient in modeling and rendering techniques using the following programs: Google Sketchup, Autodesk Revit, and Autocad. In addition, students will interface with Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator, for support and conversion purposes. An important aspect of this class is the one-on-one instruction to be given to students as they continue to develop computer modeling and design skills.

This course is organized into two parts. In the first part (Weeks 1-7) we will review Google Sketchup modeling techniques and introduce Autodesk Revit. This includes Revit interfaces, walls, components, 3D views and cameras, sheets, lighting and renderings. The second and final phase (Weeks 7-15) will emphasize more advanced Revit techniques, Photoshop post production and file transfer between programs. This includes but is not limited to shared files, links, existing materials, entourage, textures and file output.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): DS223


DS323: IAD Drawing/CAD IV: 3D MAX
This course serves as a follow-up to the Interior Architecture + Design Computer Drawing III course. Students will be instructed in the use of Autodesk 3dsmax Design for computer based rendering in both Architecture and Interior Design projects.

The course will explore the use of the computer as a tool in producing high-quality 3D models and renderings of building projects. Students will be asked to produce three dimensional computer models and images. This course will focus on learning three dimensional modeling and illustration techniques, using Autodesk 3DSMAX software and other tools. Daily lectures and labs will work in conjunction with lab assignments and reading assignments each week. Students will also interface with Revit, AutoCAD, SketchUp, 3DSMAX, and Photoshop for support and conversion purposes.

This course is organized into three parts. In the first part (Weeks 1 - 4) will introduce the interface and tools. The second phase (Weeks 5 – 9) will cover rendering techniques using lighting and textures. The third phase (Weeks 10 – 16) will include advanced rendering, and the development and production of the final class project.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): DS322


DS324: IAD Systems III: Electirical Lighting & Fixtures
This course introduces students to architectural lighting. A practical guide through the basics of lighting language including the what’s, why’s, how’s, of lighting techniques, terms and definitions, illustration, inspiration, physiology, health, luminaire performance, selection and specification gives students the basis of correct thinking about lighting and how it plays an essential role in the development of technical communication of ideas in architecture at a professional level.

This course will explore the students to every classical lighting technique and enable them to become keen critics of lighting in existing spaces with a knowledge of language descriptors enabling them to correctly identify the good, bad, and ugly and misuse of lighting and lighting technology in architectural spaces. The ability to be an effective critic using language prepares students for an eventual “seat at the table” allowing them to progress professionally much faster than those without the ability to communicate lighting ideas as a design team collaborator.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): DS225


DS325: IAD Systems IV: Wall Types & Building (Interior)
Wall Types and Building Systems introduces students to the standard components, materials and wall types of architecture and interior design. Students investigate a range of building systems including various foundation types, floor systems, interior and exterior wall types, roof systems and basic mechanical and electrical systems. As part of their course assignments, they analyze existing architectural details, create diagrams and draw examples on site, thereby learning about methods of construction and how chosen details relate to larger systems within the given building. Students then use this knowledge to design and detail architectural components of their own making, that are related to projects they have designed in the IA+D studio courses.


DS326: IAD Theory/Practice: Architectural History & Analysis
Architecture History & Analysis is a course where students learn about architecture and interior design through extended site visits to iconic local and regional buildings. Field work includes lessons in how to see, measure, draw and diagram architectural spaces at a variety of scales while learning about materials, construction methods and architectural history.

This hands-on course will introduce students to the fundamentals of architecture and interior design through direct personal experience, on-site dialogue and careful observation. Each week students will visit iconic buildings and interiors in and around Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin where they will document key spaces through measured drawings and diagrams. They will learn the fundamentals of architectural terminology and interior design principles by directly experiencing, analyzing, interpreting and recording significant spaces, features, components, materials, systems and contexts. The analytical tools, diagramming skills and spatial understanding acquired in this course will directly benefit the students’ ability to conceptualize and develop more complex programs and unique structures during senior thesis the following year. While it's primarily a course about field work and coming into contact with real materials and structures, it is also an introduction to the history and theory of American architecture from the 17th century to the present, and therefore, a good compliment to Built America and other MIAD art and architectural history courses.

Credits:
Prerequisite(s): DS227


DS327: IAD Theory/Practice: Contemporary Theory & Practice
Contemporary History and Theory looks behind the curtain of professional design practice. During field trips to local design firms, and in dialogue with select architects and designers, the students investigate how creative firms do their work today, what methods drive their design processes, what concepts and themes are revealed by their architectural works and interior designs, and how those concepts and themes reflect broader cultural conditions. Select readings and lectures are accompanied by fieldtrips to iconic local buildings of the 20th and 21st century located in the Milwaukee and Chicago areas. Special attention is given to the dialectical pairs operative within much of the discourse of 20th century architecture and interior design: for example, Neo-Classical vs. International Style; Machine Age vs. Organic; Modern vs. Post-Modern. Discussion groups analyze these “isms” of design history, and relate them to themes, “styles” and methodologies within current professional practice.

The course will include targeted research into the contemporary issues that are especially relevant to the selection of a senior thesis topic and that provide a solid foundation for thesis research and analysis.


DS420: IAD Thesis: Schematic Design
IA+D Thesis is a design-intensive course of study with an emphasis on research, personal inquiry and creative expression. The course permits each student to choose a specific topic or building type based on their personal area of interest. The objective is to define and elaborate on a specific problem or concept within that area of interest by developing a series of drawings, diagrams, models and computer renderings which ultimately manifest a clear design solution or part. This process is by nature rigorous and demanding with significant episodes of self-discovery. The resulting work, and the Spring Gallery Night Exhibition, are intended to serve as the artistic culmination of the graduating senior's three year Interior Architecture + Design experience.

The IA+D Green Studio is a real world, client sponsored project executed as a team with outside professionals and consultants. The objective of the green studio is to design, document and present a community-based project. As such, students are expected to maintain a high level of engagement, team integrity and professionalism. The course focuses on green design, and therefore emphasizes collaboration over individual expression, constructive dialogue with the client/community over personal inspiration, and the “Three E’s” of Ecology, Efficiency and social Equity over personal expression and/or ambition.

Ultimately, these two working methods, personal expression and team collaboration, are designed to co- exist and interrelate providing the student with a strong foundation for long-term personal development and a real world introduction to professional practice.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS321


DS421: IAD Thesis: Design Development & Presentation
The Interior Architecture + Design Thesis Presentation provides the student with an opportunity to develop, in final model and drawing form as well as full-scale mockups, the design of the public exhibition and presentation of his/her thesis project.

Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s): DS420


DS422: IAD Drawing/CAD V: Advanced 3D Rendering
Advanced 3D Rendering serves as a follow-up to the earlier Interior Architecture + Design Computer Drawing courses. Students are asked to further develop their understanding and ability relative to the programs introduced in earlier courses and, at the same time, to develop proficiency in newly introduced software and modeling, rendering, and post-production techniques – all in support of their senior year thesis presentations.

This course will explore the use of the computer as a tool in producing high-quality presentation materials, including hand drawings, 3D models, and Renderings. This course will focus on learning three dimensional drawing, by studying both traditional and digital illustration techniques, using computer software, hand drawings, and other tools. Students will become proficient in modeling and rendering techniques using the following programs: Google Sketchup, Autodesk Revit, and Rhinoceros. In addition, students will interface with Adobe Photoshop, AutoCad, and Adobe Illustrator, for support and conversion purposes. An important aspect of this class is the one-on-one instruction to be given to students as they continue to develop their thesis work and presentations – this allows learning to be focused on the individual’s needs.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): DS323


DS423: IAD Drawing/CAD VI: Architectural Graphics & E-Portfolio
Architectural Graphics and E-Portfolio gives each student the opportunity to assemble his/her best work from school and professional practice into a compact, presentable format for review by prospective employers or graduate school admission committees.

The Interior Architecture + Design program requires graduating seniors to compile a comprehensive portfolio to serve as a record of their experience from the time that they enter into the IA+D Area, including appropriate documentation of their coursework at MIAD as well as work done in internship and other professionally-related experiences. This document will serve as a record of the student's experiences, as evidence of understanding gained and ability displayed, and as such, as the most important tool in that student's effort to attract the best possible position in a design office or entry into a graduate school of their choosing upon graduation from MIAD.

In addition, students will work with the software of their choosing to produce high-quality renderings for the Senior Thesis Show in April. This portion of the course is largely self-directed; each student is responsible for determining the best approach to rendering based on his or her individual project. Because each student’s project presents unique modeling and rendering challenges, students are responsible for coming to class ready to meet individually to discuss their progress as well as specific questions or issues regarding their project.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): DS422


DS424: IAD Systems V: Context and Codes in the Built Environment
Codes and Contexts within the Built Environment is a senior level course in the IA+D Systems Sequence. This course is an independent, content driven course that serves as a supplement to the IA+D Senior Thesis. The senior IA+D student’s independently selected Senior Thesis will serve as a vehicle for many of the exercises assigned for this course. Primary areas of inquiry will include:

- review and application of building codes,and
- study and analysis of both the natural as well as the built context.

Codes and Contexts within the Built Environment will introduce the student to both the legal context (codes) and the physical context (both natural as well as built) within which architecture and interior design must develop. The legal context is described in part through restrictive building codes and zoning ordinances that address life safety and quality of life issues. The physical context for an architectural or interior design project addresses both environmental as well as cultural forces affecting the design. The legal, environmental, and cultural forces at play in any design scenario, while clearly limiting one’s design response, also serve to liberate a designer’s thinking by serving to provide a clear design direction.

Credits: 1.5
Prerequisite(s): DS325


DS425: IAD Systems VI: Acoustics, Structures & Building Systems
Structures, Acoustics and Building Systems introduces students to the relationship between structure, sound, materiality and building systems. In the first half of the course, students learn how to draw structural axonometric diagrams, thereby examining the basic components of various structural systems. Readings and discussion topics include: soils; footings and foundations; building types and construction materials; live and dead loads; lateral forces; trusses and roof membranes; and connections/joints. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems are also reviewed, and students explore their interrelationship with building structure and interior design components. In the second half of the course, students examine basic acoustical concepts. Lectures highlight issues of sound isolation vs. sound transmission; analysis of various room shapes; appropriate application of wall types, interior cladding materials and ceiling treatments, among other topics. The main goal of the course is to help students become aware of the issues that architects and interior designers face when communicating their design intent with structural engineers, sound consultants and MEP contractors.


DS426: IAD Theory/Practice: Sustainable Materials & Green Design
The IA+D Green Studio focuses on how to respond as a team to the real-world demands, requirements and contingencies of a client-sponsored, environmentally responsible project. The course methodology emphasizes the use of green materials and technologies from the start, requiring that students employ “whole systems thinking” and “design for climate” with appropriate solar orientation, passive energy strategies, natural ventilation, non-toxic materials, efficient fixtures and other green techniques in mind. While aesthetics are important, program development, spatial organization, construction methods, efficient energy systems and building envelope performance are the foremost emphasis of this studio. Understanding LEED guidelines, the Living Building Challenge and other green building standards is an integral part of the process.


DS427: IAD Theory/Practice: Design Details & Working Drawings
Details and Working Drawings has two interrelated goals: 1) an introduction to the standard construction document process and its graphic methods; and 2) an in-depth investigation of green design details and construction techniques as seen through the lens of the USGBC’s LEED rating system. Students learn the basic order, logic, graphic conventions and terminology that comprise a typical construction document set. They visit local buildings, examine different types of drawings related to different parts of the building and learn the conventions used by various teams (civil and structural engineers, MEP, landscape, etc.) involved in producing the typical drawing set. The process of LEED certification is used to build the students knowledge of sustainable site planning, green materials and construction techniques, energy efficient building systems and water use. Students learn how to draw various sections through the building envelope, how to design appropriate interior details, and how to navigate the basic LEED certification process.


Download the 2016-17 Program of Study Catalog, with every Major and all course descriptions.

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